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Saturday, 13. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Thoughts on Classification and Tagging

I’ve been using StreetComplete for the past few days now. It’s great fun, but I often run into questions where I’m thinking “Well… I don’t know that any of these options are right.” (Or “If Regina wasn’t a uniquely hot mess, then maybe one of these answers would actually work!” I’m looking at you Albert street rail crossing.) The tagging and questionable-edits channels on the osm-world discord h

I’ve been using StreetComplete for the past few days now. It’s great fun, but I often run into questions where I’m thinking “Well… I don’t know that any of these options are right.” (Or “If Regina wasn’t a uniquely hot mess, then maybe one of these answers would actually work!” I’m looking at you Albert street rail crossing.) The tagging and questionable-edits channels on the osm-world discord have been massive helps.

It isn’t until you start tagging out in the wild that you start coming up with weird questions that you wouldn’t have thought up otherwise. Like:

  • Do you mark an intersection as having no marked lanes? (Are they even supposed to have marked lanes if they aren’t turn lanes?)
  • Is a concrete block coloured red a form of tactile paving, even if it has no different texture to it from any other block?
  • How far does a street light have to be from a bus stop before you can say that bus stop is unlit at night?
  • If there are no sidewalks next to a road and there is no way for a pedestrian to walk along the side (like if it’s too much of a slope), are they allowed to walk on the road?
    • (I don’t think I’ve seen a sign telling pedestrians that they aren’t allowed to in these situations here, but I don’t know anyone who would even want to in the places where it happens.)
  • Why does Regina have so many pedways over streets cars drive under, and none of them are marked with a maximum height sign?
    • (It’s probably because in those areas, trucks aren’t allowed. But I never even noticed they didn’t have the signs until I thought to look!)

Friday, 12. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

My Open Mapping Guru Fellowship Journey

My journey into mapping began in 2012 when I was a college student. I started by mapping my village and later expanded to mapping numerous banks as part of my work in 2016-17. This initial exposure sparked my interest in community mapping.

In 2018, I began contributing to OpenStreetMap (OSM) alongside my volunteer contributions on Wikipedia and Wikidata. This involvement allowed me to br

My journey into mapping began in 2012 when I was a college student. I started by mapping my village and later expanded to mapping numerous banks as part of my work in 2016-17. This initial exposure sparked my interest in community mapping.

In 2018, I began contributing to OpenStreetMap (OSM) alongside my volunteer contributions on Wikipedia and Wikidata. This involvement allowed me to bridge the gap between platforms by linking Wikidata entries with OSM and vice versa, enhancing the data quality and interconnectivity between these valuable resources.

Joining the Open Mapping Guru Fellowship has been a transformative experience. The fellowship provided me with access to various tools that have significantly enhanced my mapping activities. The tasks during the program helped me learn and expand my knowledge about mapping in OSM. These tasks ranged from mapping amenities using mobile applications like Every Door and remote mapping using JOSM and mapping and validating using the Tasking Manager.

Through this fellowship, I have not only improved my technical abilities but also deepened my commitment to the OSM community. The Open Mapping Guru Fellowship has been a significant part of my journey, and I’m excited about what lies ahead.

I am grateful to HOT and APHub team for this opportunity to be part of such a dynamic and collaborative environment.

As I continue my mapping journey, I look forward to applying the skills and insights gained from the fellowship to make a meaningful impact on the mapping and open data ecosystems.


TITIK KOORDINAT ABSENSI SISWA DAN GURU

PROSES ABSENSI

PROSES ABSENSI


Five years of OSMCAL

It just feels like yesterday that I started OpenStreetMap Calendar, but that’s maybe because the journey has been mostly smooth sailing. I started it sometime in early summer of 2019, made it more useful by the end of that year by adding calendar subscriptions and an API. In 2020, thanks to the Microgrant, I was able to focus a little bit more on it, so it got time zone support and a wiki integr

It just feels like yesterday that I started OpenStreetMap Calendar, but that’s maybe because the journey has been mostly smooth sailing. I started it sometime in early summer of 2019, made it more useful by the end of that year by adding calendar subscriptions and an API. In 2020, thanks to the Microgrant, I was able to focus a little bit more on it, so it got time zone support and a wiki integration, which then replaced the old wiki-based calendar in December 2020.

Since then I have teased a few features, but not that much has actually happened: There has been the odd improvement here and there, at some point I had to add minimal moderation tools so that spam can be removed without me having to shell into the database, but other than that OSMCAL lives its own life thanks to the users who use it.

Until today, more than 2800 events have been created:

Events, sorted by month

There is an OSM event happening somewhere, almost every day:

Monthly calendar view

We also have a healthy user base growth, with almost 2000 registered users now:

Cumulative registered users as chart

People always ask “what’s next?” to which I say “probably not much”. I’m quite happy with the current state, people keep using it and I don’t want to change things just for the sake of change. Every website wants you to download megabytes of JavaScript, grab your attention, show you as many ads as possible, and have you can look at the content through a slot. I want OSMCAL to be none of that: “Less, but better” is the guiding principle.

Events by county chart

There is only one goal I haven’t reached yet: Global reach. There are only 24 countries that have more than 10 events, with the majority coming from Germany, the USA, France and Great Britain. Congratulations to Taiwan for making it to 5th place. If you’re from an under-represented country, I want to hear from you! Please let me know what we can do better!

Thanks to all people for creating events, filing issues on Github, asking questions and helping out!


Translated list of SOTM FR 2024 talks

WeeklyOSM informed us recently, that the videos of the recent SOTM FR are now available at peertube.openstreetmap.fr/c/sotm_fr_2024/videos.

There are english subtitles that seem to be good enough to get the gist of the video. Which is why I asked ChatGPT to take the RSS feed and create a translated summary so I can pick those that I find most interesting.

I thought this might be

WeeklyOSM informed us recently, that the videos of the recent SOTM FR are now available at https://peertube.openstreetmap.fr/c/sotm_fr_2024/videos.

There are english subtitles that seem to be good enough to get the gist of the video. Which is why I asked ChatGPT to take the RSS feed and create a translated summary so I can pick those that I find most interesting.

I thought this might be interesting for other, so here is the list…


25 - OSerM: Mapping Stations Today to Improve Them Tomorrow

Summary: This presentation by Guillaume Chauvet discusses the use of OpenStreetMap (OSM) data for mapping and improving train stations. It focuses on how OSM data is utilized within and around stations as part of the deployment of Metropolitan Regional Express Services (SERM) projects.

Link to Video: Watch Here


29 - Promoting Tourist Areas with OSM: The Experience of L’Abel Destination (Allier)

Summary: Located in the picturesque landscapes of Bourbonnais in Allier, L’Abel Destination used OpenStreetMap to enhance its territory. Within a year, the local tourism office staff trained in OSM, contributing detailed data on heritage sites, health services, shops, and local producers. This collaborative project highlights the process from funding to the final CartoGuide publication.

Link to Video: Watch Here


28 - Carto Graou: Mapping Under the Trains

Summary: Nicolas Wurtz presents the story and future of “Carto Graou,” an online public railway map. Using polygons, lines, and points similar to LEGO pieces, the project integrates real-time data, opendata, and opensource elements. Initially aimed at enthusiasts, it has become indispensable and even useful for SNCF employees, with OpenStreetMap playing a crucial role in its success.

Link to Video: Watch Here


65 - Updates on the Simplified Street Plan

Summary: The Simplified Street Plan is expanding across France and becoming increasingly accessible. The team from the State startup at the National Agency for Territorial Cohesion provides an update on its deployment and the areas where it is effectively usable for OpenStreetMap.
Link to video: Watch Video


63 - OSMTracker-Android | Customize, Contribute, and Maintain

Summary: This presentation aims to (re)introduce the OSMTracker app on Android. This app allows contributions to OpenStreetMap without compromising road safety or the enjoyment of a bike ride or walk. Learn why to use this tool, how to customize it, how to use it for contributing to OpenStreetMap, and finally, how and why to maintain it. Throughout this presentation, the speaker shares their work on the tool and how to facilitate contributions for beginner (iD editor) and intermediate/advanced (JOSM) contributors.
Link to video: Watch Video


53 - Cyclist Accommodation in Commercial Areas

Summary: What is the quality of the accommodation provided to cyclists by the stores in a commercial area? Three criteria are used to evaluate bicycle parking: quality, quantity, and proximity. All of this is based on OpenStreetMap data, of course! The stores are then categorized into four groups: green (best), yellow, orange, or red (worst). Those that provide good accommodations for cyclists are highlighted, while the others are called out. This presentation covers OSM topics such as “amenity=bicycle_parking,” overpass turbo, and umap, with a difficulty level of easy to medium. More generally, it discusses cycling, cycling policy, and cycling infrastructure. This is an ongoing associative work conducted in Grenoble, and your ideas to improve it are welcome!
Link to video: Watch Video


49 - The Rise of Cycling in France: What Impact Do the BNAC & Public Policies Have on OSM?

Summary: After discussing OSM’s involvement in the development of the BNAC model, this presentation will explore an example of mapping driven by public policies. What needs, tools, and impacts are there?
Speakers: Simon Reau, Elisabeth Felix-Goutal
Link to video: Watch Video


12 - The OCSGE and CoSIA of IGN: A New Opportunity for OSM?

Summary: Updating land use in OpenStreetMap (OSM) is crucial as OSM has become a reference, and ecological transition policies require precise and up-to-date data. In 2009, the import of Corine Land Cover provided initial coverage for OSM in France. Since then, the territory has evolved significantly, and new precise data from IGN (OCSGE and CoSIA) encourages the OSM community to update maps. OCSGE is a free and open database, while CoSIA describes land cover using AI. This presentation offers insights into updating land use in OSM using IGN data and field verifications.
Speaker: Jean-Louis Zimmermann
Link to video: Watch Video


41.a Salle 324 - GIS Architecture at SDIS34 for Exploiting OSM Data

Summary: SDIS34 utilizes OSM data within its GIS service. Following previous presentations, this session delves into the technical architecture implemented for this purpose. It covers the LeBonTag application, PostGIS databases, SQL queries for thematic data extraction from OSM, materialized views, and automation of extractions via Python scripts. Aimed at somewhat technical profiles, the presentation strives to remain accessible to a broader audience.
Speaker: Nicolas Moyroud
Link to video: Watch Video


41.b Salle 326 - OSM & Accessibility for Disabled People: Keys to Understanding and Tools for Contribution

Summary: Accessibility is crucial for disabled people, requiring suitable accommodations and reliable information for journey planning. The Mobility Orientation Law of December 24, 2019, mandates local authorities to create databases on the accessibility of transportation and roads. Since April 2024, the open-source tool Acceslibre Mobilité has been available for data collection. OSM plays a key role by enabling the community to map the specific needs of users. The OSM community, driven by CNIG since 2020, has worked at both international and national levels to better structure disability-related data. New initiatives and collection tools are emerging, enhancing environmental accessibility and user information.
Speakers: Jean-Louis Zimmermann, Muriel Larrouy
Link to video: Watch Video


61 - Bicycle Parking in Major European Cities: A Reflection of European (Mapping) Inequalities?

Summary: How do major French cities compare to other major European cities in terms of bicycle parking? To answer this question, Geovelo conducted a comparative analysis using OpenStreetMap data. Do the study results reflect contribution inequalities or actual infrastructure differences? This presentation attempts to answer that question.
Speakers: Simon Reau, Elisabeth Felix-Goutal
Link to video: Watch Video


57 - Re-broadcast of OpenData Enriched by Osmose-QA

Summary: Osmose-QA is a tool for reporting anomalies in OSM data and enriching OSM by detecting missing objects or tags using compatible OpenData. It also enriches OpenData with OSM, supporting a broader application of the BANO concept to other datasets.

Link to Video: Watch here


44 - Presentation of Cartes.app

Summary: Cartes.app is a free and independent alternative to GAFAMaps. It uses OSM in a modern web interface and combines it with various other free data sources to provide a user-friendly mapping experience.

Link to Video: Watch here


39 - “Clearance”: Collaboratively Controlling OpenStreetMap Data for Thematic Uses

Summary: Clearance offers a new approach for data re-users to ensure the quality of shared data by providing partial synchronization of OSM extracts based on quality rules, facilitating rapid updates and collaborative maintenance.

Link to Video: Watch here


38 - Working with the Community as a Company: TomTom’s Commitments in France and Abroad

Summary: Priscilla, Salim, and Hervé discuss TomTom’s various contributions globally, including humanitarian support, university collaborations, and initiatives related to the Paris 2024 Olympics.

Link to Video: Watch here


33 - The Multi-Thematic Update of OpenStreetMap within the Development Pole of the Vaucluse Department

Summary: The development pole oversees various missions, aiming to update OSM data in Vaucluse by integrating recent projects and existing tools to enhance local mapping relevance.

Link to Video: Watch here


30 - Cartography for Mountain Biking

  • Summary: Explore the world of mountain biking as a cartographer! Imagine navigating breathtaking trails with all the information you need at your fingertips. This video details how UtagawaVTT.com created a specialized map for mountain biking, covering terrain shading, elevation lines, and notable points to discover.
  • Link: Watch the Video

26 - The ODbL License Explained by the OSM Professionals Federation

  • Summary: OpenStreetMap data is published under the ODbL license, defining the rights and responsibilities of users and producers. This video explains this open data license, which ensures balance within the OSM community, aimed at individual contributors, institutions, and companies alike.
  • Link: Watch the Video

23 - Panoramax: Feedback from SDIS34 on RTK/360° Imagery

  • Summary: Since November 2023, the SDIS34 (firefighters of Hérault) has been capturing 360° images for Panoramax. This video discusses their objectives, including documenting DFCI tracks and new residential areas, using advanced equipment and sharing their experiences and future plans.
  • Link: Watch the Video

17 - Panoramax: Getting Hands-On!

  • Summary: This video explains how to retrieve community-shared photos from Panoramax, focusing on the development aspects. Viewers will learn to use the JavaScript viewer, the Web API, and STAC tools with practical coding examples and helpful tips.
  • Link: Watch the Video

สำรวจโลก

ค้นหา สิ่งที่ทุกคนอยากพบเจอในส่วนของการค้นหาข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมของที่เกี่ยวข้องมากที่สุดในแผ่นที่ค้าหา

ค้นหา สิ่งที่ทุกคนอยากพบเจอในส่วนของการค้นหาข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมของที่เกี่ยวข้องมากที่สุดในแผ่นที่ค้าหา


Possible Return

Kinda ditched OSM last year when school ended. Gonna try to finish micro-mapping my neighborhood at the very least. That was my goal from the beginning and it remains so to this day. This time, though, I truly have absolutely nothing better to do.

After that, who knows? No promises… Probably gonna ditch it again when school starts up again x)

Kinda ditched OSM last year when school ended. Gonna try to finish micro-mapping my neighborhood at the very least. That was my goal from the beginning and it remains so to this day. This time, though, I truly have absolutely nothing better to do.

After that, who knows? No promises… Probably gonna ditch it again when school starts up again x)

Thursday, 11. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

so how do you map beaver dams? 🇨🇦

There are a couple I walk by every week, both pretty large.

I’ve tagged them natural=beaver_dam ‘cos I found it in some discussion on the wiki somewhere.

Considering so much of Canada is shaped by beaver dams, I think they should get more respect.

(the location for this diary entry is near one of the beaver dams. It was not actually writen while near it. If i

There are a couple I walk by every week, both pretty large.

I’ve tagged them natural=beaver_dam ‘cos I found it in some discussion on the wiki somewhere.

Considering so much of Canada is shaped by beaver dams, I think they should get more respect.

(the location for this diary entry is near one of the beaver dams. It was not actually writen while near it. If it had been, the beavers would have done their irritated tail-slapping dive to scare me away. It sounds like someone throwing a large rock into deep water.)


Day 36 - Village Fushëz

I hope the DDoS attack on OSM server was not serious, and they did not manage to do any harm. Many thanks to all the people that worked on solving the issue!

Today i mapped village Fushëz a village located in Elbasan with a population of around 188.

“#100villagesin100days #day36”

I hope the DDoS attack on OSM server was not serious, and they did not manage to do any harm. Many thanks to all the people that worked on solving the issue!

Today i mapped village Fushëz a village located in Elbasan with a population of around 188.

“#100villagesin100days #day36”


OSM'S EXPERIENCE

The openstreetmap project is the future of free data for resilience to the many problems of development and humanitarian response that we have in our communities. It gives access to a large database produced by enthusiasts, volunteers and people who believe that development or resilience in the face of the crises we face will require the support of such an initiative.

Someone once told m

The openstreetmap project is the future of free data for resilience to the many problems of development and humanitarian response that we have in our communities. It gives access to a large database produced by enthusiasts, volunteers and people who believe that development or resilience in the face of the crises we face will require the support of such an initiative.

Someone once told me that to be immortal you have to give without expecting anything in return; support voluntary social actions as best you can,

support the initiative by making a donation of any amount, because at the end of the day it’s the gesture and the intention behind the gesture that counts.

http://supporting.openstreetmap.org/donate

or by having an impact on the management and direction of the Openstreetmap Foundation by becoming a member.

https://supporting.openstreetmap.org/#Membership-Categories

I’ve been a volunteer at openstreetmap since 2022 on 28 April and every day I try not only to help the openstreetmap project grow but also to participate in seeking and proposing solutions that could solve the problems we have in Africa, particularly in my country Cameroon, in nutrition, energy, quality education based on our cultures, water and empowering young people to face the challenges of our society. In short, the planning and development of our country

Wednesday, 10. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Mapping unrecorded burial grounds

The last couple of days, I’ve been diving into a very sad chapter of Irish history - “industrial schools” which were children’s homes with less than favourable conditions for some of the children.

It stumbled into that rabbit hole, because a friend who went on a spin with me (I don’t drive myself, but I like being dependent on other people that way, because I always learn something from

The last couple of days, I’ve been diving into a very sad chapter of Irish history - “industrial schools” which were children’s homes with less than favourable conditions for some of the children.

It stumbled into that rabbit hole, because a friend who went on a spin with me (I don’t drive myself, but I like being dependent on other people that way, because I always learn something from them that I wouldn’t have, if I drove myself) to look for holy wells had mentioned in passing a boys’ cemetery/ burial ground at St. Patrick’s Industrial School near Kilkenny. This school closed at some point after 1965 and the boys were transferred to St. Joseph’s Industrial School within Kilkenny city. St. Joseph’s had been only for girls until then.

I contacted our heritage officer at the local county council trying to find out whether they knew anything about this cemetery (I’m gonna stick with the OSM terminology from now on), but they had no record of it. It was also not marked on the official maps by Ordnance Survey Ireland (or the historical Ordnance Survey maps conducted by the UK government before Ireland’s independence).

Another friend who knew of the location offered to drive out with me and show me. So we went and I took photographs of all the grave markers (Category on Wikimedia), did a bit of mapillary and mapped the area as best I could (https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/1298817559) 68 boys and one woman (as I found out later, a matron in her 80s) were recorded as having been buried there. I did a little more research on them which you can read here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_names_recorded_at_St_Patrick%27s_Industrial_School_Cemetery,_Kilkenny

When we left, my “driver” mentioned that the nuns who ran the establishment (I hesitate to call it a school) also had a cemetery there, but we were pressed for time, so we didn’t visit it that day.

The next day, I cycled out and found the nuns’ cemetery which I also photographed and mapped as a cemetery.

It then got me thinking that there should be one at St. Joseph’s, but the heritage officer had informed me, again, that there was no record of a cemetery there. Having seen two (unrecorded ones) at St. Patrick’s, I wasn’t deterred and went looking for one at St. Joseph’s. Part of the land had been sold and new walls been built since it closed down as the Industrial School, but I found a cross on top of a blocked up entrance.

I had to leave the property and walk around to get access to the other side. That area had once belonged to St. Joseph’s, I believe, but is now used by SOS as a facility for disabled people. I spotted a newish looking gate and peered through - and I saw grave markers. I had found the nuns’ cemetery. Again, I mapped it and photographed all the grave markers for upload to Wikimedia. This cemetery was actually recorded on the Ordnance Survey map, but was not known to the County Council.

I’m fairly convinced that there are girls buried there somewhere, but I was not able to find any proof of it. Sadly, Ireland has a long history of not recording the graves of people they didn’t deem worthy. If you feel very strong and have a high tolerance level, you might want to search online for “Tuam babies”. There is also quite a bit to be found online about abuse scandals at St. Joseph’s, but it is certainly not light reading.

I’m afraid there are hundreds of cemeteries like that where institutionalized people were buried without proper records. Paupers, babies, children, unwed mothers, possibly also people with mental or physical disabilities. Local people sometimes know about these, and I think the least we can do is record them on OSM and let the local authorities know, so that they can update their records.

However, sometimes even the locals don’t know about them. A friend of mine went to St. Patrick’s Industrial School until the age of 12 and said that they never knew about the cemetery there. If a boy vanished, they were told they had gone “on holidays” or “home”. Considering how long ago these establishments closed down, the people who actually buried the children are probably no longer alive to ask.

There was also a “Historic Town’s Atlas” researched by a well renowned local historian (John Bradley Wikipedia) and published by the Royal Irish Academy (check it out here) which does not make mention of any of these cemeteries. I wonder if he was a bit biased towards Kilkenny’s medieval history. I mean, I get it, I’d rather research medieval things that are too long ago to get upset about, but history is history and needs to be recorded.

I will continue to record these on OSM wherever I find them, but for my own mental health, I think I won’t go any deeper than that.


Capisaldi e bunker della Seconda guerra mondiale a Nord Ovest di Roma

  • Introduzione
  • Classificazione e risultati
  • Sitografia
  • Bibliografia
Introduzione

La mappatura è stata costruita mediante l’interpretazione delle immagini satellitari disponibili in JOSM e la documentazione consultabile su Internet riportata nella sitografia e bibliografia. Sono state individuate 104 postazioni militari costruite per la difesa

Introduzione

La mappatura è stata costruita mediante l’interpretazione delle immagini satellitari disponibili in JOSM e la documentazione consultabile su Internet riportata nella sitografia e bibliografia. Sono state individuate 104 postazioni militari costruite per la difesa di Roma e per contrastare possibili sbarchi a NO della capitale. Alcune decine di postazioni militari, come i capisaldi di Castel di Guido, Ponte Galeria, Trigoria e Vitinia o i bunker di Villa Torlonia, Ada e Soratte, erano già mappati in OSM altri, in particolare quelli posti lungo la costa tirrenica, sono nuovi.

Figura 1 Mappa dei caposaldi e bunker a NO di Roma.

Mappa_caposaldi_bunker

Visualizza a schermo intero

Classificazione e risultati

In base a quanto definito nella wiki di OSM (Tag:military=bunker - OpenStreetMap Wiki) si è cercato di individuare il tipo di costruzione ed impiego: dei 104 bunker solo 37 non si è stabilito con certezza il tipo (n.d.). Il bunker più presente è il Tobruk (Tobruk (bunker) - Wikipedia) con 23 siti seguito da 21 casematte (Pillbox (military) - Wikipedia) e 13 postazioni in prevalenza controcarro. Vi sono anche 2 bunker comando (Soratte e Villa Torlonia) e 5 osservatori.

Tabella 1 Tipo di bunker.

Tipo Numero
Tobruk 23
Casamatta 21
Polveriera 2
Rifugio antiaereo 1
Comando 2
Postazione fuoco sbarramento 13
Osservatorio 5
n.d. 37
Totale 104

Dalla mappa sembra che la costruzione dei 104 bunker sia stata fatta in base a due principali obiettivi a difesa di Roma:

  • Contrastare lungo la costa possibili sbarchi (38 bunker);
  • Impedire l’accesso alla capitale attraverso le principali strade di accesso (65 bunker organizzati in 6 capisaldi).

I caposaldi meglio organizzati per la difesa di Roma sono quelli di Ponte Galeria (18 bunker) posto sulla SP 1 Via Portuense, quello di Castel di Guido (11 bunker) posto sulla SS 1 Aurelia e quello di Vitinia (9 bunker) sulla SS 8bis Via Ostiense.

Tabella 2 Distribuzione per Comune dei capisaldi e bunker.

Comune Caposaldo Numero
Cerveteri   2
     
Civitavecchia   10
     
Fiumicino   6
  Caposaldo Castel di Guido 1
  n.d. 5
     
Ladispoli   2
     
Montalto di Castro   2
     
Roma   64
  Caposaldo Castel di Guido 10
  Caposaldo Monte Mario 3
  Caposaldo Osteria Malpasso 4
  Caposaldo Ponte Galeria 18
  Caposaldo Trigoria 3
  Caposaldo Vitinia 9
  n.d. 17
     
Santa Marinella   9
     
Sant’Oreste   1
  Caposaldo Trigoria 1
     
Tarquinia   8
     
Totale complessivo   104



Tabella 3 Capisaldi difensivi e tipo di bunker.

Postazioni Tipo di bunker Numero
Caposaldo Castel di Guido   11
  Osservatorio 1
  Postazione fuoco sbarramento 5
  n.d. 5
     
Caposaldo Monte Mario   3
  Casamatta 3
     
Caposaldo Osteria Malpasso   4
  Tobruk 1
  n.d. 3
     
Caposaldo Ponte Galeria   18
  Casamatta 6
  Postazione fuoco sbarramento 4
  n.d. 8
     
Caposaldo Trigoria   4
  n.d. 4
     
Caposaldo Vitinia   9
  Casamatta 7
  Postazione fuoco sbarramento 2
     
Altre postazioni difensive   55
  Tobruk 22
  Casamatta 5
  Polveriera 2
  Rifugio antiaereo 1
  Comando 2
  Postazione fuoco sbarramento 2
  Osservatorio 4
  n.d. 17
     
Totale complessivo   104


Sitografia

Casematte Roma 1943
Bunker di Roma
Info.Roma
Sotterranei di Roma
Bunker Soratte
Bunker e rifugi antiaerei di Villa Torlonia
Bunker Villa Ada

Bibliografia

Grassi L., I bunker di Roma. Guida ai rifugi antiaerei, Centro Ricerche Speleo Archeologiche - Sotterranei di Roma, 2012
Grazzini A., Il Caposaldo del Torrente Arrone, bunker in difesa di Roma durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale
Lestingi L., Atlante Italiano delle difese costiere nella Seconda guerra mondiale, 2022
Paolucci G., Orlandi G., Bunker Soratte, 2018


Anticipatory mapping in action, The story from Kigali with Eco Mappers

Anticipatory action , mapping for landslides and flooding preparedness in the north western provinces of Rwanda Project Launch with Online Mapping of 50,000 Buildings

The rainy season, from April to June always reminds us that we need to be more than ready, but one would wonder why? We have our brothers and sisters who reside in northern and western provinces who are periodically exposed to th

Anticipatory action , mapping for landslides and flooding preparedness in the north western provinces of Rwanda

Project Launch with Online Mapping of 50,000 Buildings

The rainy season, from April to June always reminds us that we need to be more than ready, but one would wonder why? We have our brothers and sisters who reside in northern and western provinces who are periodically exposed to the consequences of climate change and experience extreme weather and heavy rain every season. We have resolved to not sit and wait again, so we have decided to take action, Not the heavy one to uplift or relocate every one in high risk but do what we do the best. mapping!
And our story here demonstrates that if we map together, we will overcome the disasters together. especially landslides upstream causing flooding downstream on a periodic frequency. OSM RWANDA April 2024 Mapathon 65

Saturday 27th April 2024 marked the launch of the Anticipatory action.

mapping, where young people came together to make their contributions in open mapping, The participation was amazing, more than 45 young people especially those in Universities campus pursuing courses in engineering, agriculture, and environment and so on. The launch coincided with Umuganda Saturday which is widely recognized for its contribution to the cleanliness of Rwanda and Kigali in particular. But people still fail to recognize that the concept of Umuganda, is not limited to physical activities, apart from the main objective to work collaboratively towards a common goal. The communities come together to share their concerns and share more updates on the current affairs on village level as well as on the nationwide programs. ![Alt text]OSM RWANDA April 2024 Mapathon 03

And this is a special occasion, for the tech communities, it’s a platform to contribute digitally and that’s where the contribution of open street map Rwanda comes in every month.
This special task, comes from the inspiration, though sad one, of the mapping done in 2023 responding to the flooding which outbreak specifically in Northern and Western provinces of Rwanda and claimed around 130 people’s lives. We specifically mapped around 50 thousands buildings involving more than 300 volunteers from all over the world and we did field mapping using an innovative tool FMTM, Field mapping tasking manager, at the testing mode where we collected more than 5000 buildings status after the flooding. Part of the action taken after the flooding, were the relocation of the people living in high risk zones in those areas and the buffer zone which were introduced around the Mukungwa River.

FMTM - 2

Anticipatory mapping in action.

The lessons learnt was a need to facilitate people ready to respond especially the youth, the youth need skills and equipment to map. Part of the youth contributing to the Shyira mapping were the ones who had been affected by the flooding on Nyamutera river affluent to Mukungwa River. The 2024 target for detailed mapping, is about mapping and collecting attributes information around Nyamutera river and other rivers which are prone to the flooding outbreak, we will also have a closer look at the causing factors, the rainfall induced landslides upstream, as it has been highlighted as one of many hotspots in need of attention in the wider logic of anticipatory action. We don’t need a story of disasters and from that statement we are ready, we need a resilient youth capable of contributing to their own community and going beyond. We mapped 77%, validated 35%, building - 75,422 building of the region of interest is so far mapped with time , until now as I speak. thanks to the contributors who started as early as possible to make anticipatory action a reality.

OSM RWANDA April 2024 Mapathon 04


OpenStreetMap NextGen Development Diary #14

Welcome to the fourteenth OpenStreetMap NextGen development diary.

🔖 You can read other development diaries here:
www.openstreetmap.org/user/NorthCrab/diary/

⭐ This project is open-source — join us today:
github.com/openstreetmap-ng/openstreetmap-ng

🛈 This initiative is not affiliated with the OpenStreetMap Foundation.

In case you missed it…

Rec

Welcome to the fourteenth OpenStreetMap NextGen development diary.

🔖 You can read other development diaries here:
https://www.openstreetmap.org/user/NorthCrab/diary/

⭐ This project is open-source — join us today:
https://github.com/openstreetmap-ng/openstreetmap-ng

GitHub Stars

🛈 This initiative is not affiliated with the OpenStreetMap Foundation.

In case you missed it…

Recently, we showcased Search 2.0: a comprehensive overhaul of the search functionality. For the first time, OSM search is now simple and intuitive to use. It’s a must-see (there’s a video demo too)!

OpenStreetMap-NG Repository Moved

This week we have moved the openstreetmap-ng code repository from Zaczero/openstreetmap-ng to openstreetmap-ng/openstreetmap-ng. All stars, forks, and issues have been transferred automatically. All previous URLs are also redirecting to the new address. If you have previously interacted with the project, there’s nothing you need to do.

Why? First of all, since this is a community project, it doesn’t make sense to keep it hosted under an individual account. The project should be hosted under an organizational account where more than one person can manage it. Secondly, by having a project hosted under an organization, we can better manage contributors’ permissions. And lastly, contributors now have the option to display a project badge on their personal GitHub profiles. That’s one more way for us to say thank you!

The organization is free to join to everyone. Check out this wiki page on how to do so.

Finished Directions Implementation

We have also finished the directions page implementation. When searching for a place in the directions, you will now use our improved search engine backend. We have also fixed various small bugs that we experienced on the current website, and made the map segments hoverable and clickable. For comparison, in the current Ruby implementation, only the sidebar handles events. This change makes the directions page more convenient and consistent to use.

Codebase Improvements

Lots of this week’s development time went into improving the codebase. We have now integrated mypy into our workflow, which can detect a wide range of type-related bugs, providing a more stable and predictable development. This integration required more than 300 code parts to be changed.

Additionally, we have dropped the anyio dependency in favor of Python’s standard asyncio. This is one less dependency that new contributors will have to learn. Asyncio provides better performance than anyio (which is an abstraction layer around asyncio) and is more compatible with the Python typing system—especially important now that we use mypy.

Migrated History Feeds

Last but not least, we have finished the migration of the /history/feed and /user/name/history/feed Atom feeds. This brings us one step closer to feature parity with the Ruby implementation.

While working on this migration, we spotted and corrected a 12-year-old bug. Simply, the history feeds advertised their contents as being licensed under CC-BY-SA 2.0, which was changed to ODbL in 2012. The license now points to the OpenStreetMap copyright page, which is a more informative and accurate resource.

Sponsors

This week’s work was sponsored by 17 people!
8 donors on Liberapay, and 9 on GitHub Sponsors.

We can do this and we will do this. Thank you for supporting this project!

Please consider supporting the OpenStreetMap-NG development with any amount. As a thank you, you will be eligible for the unique OpenStreetMap-NG Founder profile badge. You will also help to push the project forward 🏋.


Day 35 - Village Gradec

Today i mapped Gradec which is a different Gradec from the one i mapped yesterday.

I have been noticing that we have so many villages with same names in Albania. I might do a list of all the villages who share the same name and map them :P.

“#100villagesin100days #day35”

Today i mapped Gradec which is a different Gradec from the one i mapped yesterday.

I have been noticing that we have so many villages with same names in Albania. I might do a list of all the villages who share the same name and map them :P.

“#100villagesin100days #day35”


Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road

Minister of Public Works and Housing Basuki Hadimuljono and several other officials accompanied Vice President @kyai_marufamin to inaugurate the Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road at the Cileungsi River Bridge KM 57+400, Bogor Regency, West Java, on Tuesday (July 9th, 2024).

The Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road, spanning 26.18 km, is part of the Jakarta Outer Ring Road (

Minister of Public Works and Housing Basuki Hadimuljono and several other officials accompanied Vice President @kyai_marufamin to inaugurate the Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road at the Cileungsi River Bridge KM 57+400, Bogor Regency, West Java, on Tuesday (July 9th, 2024).

The Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road, spanning 26.18 km, is part of the Jakarta Outer Ring Road (JORR) 2 network, crossing four regions: Depok City, Bekasi City, Bogor Regency, and Bekasi Regency.

This toll road consists of two sections: Section 1 from Cimanggis Junction to Jatikarya and Section 2 from Jatikarya to Cibitung. Previously, Section 1 and Section 2A, with a total length of 6.5 km, were already operational, while Section 2B from Cikeas to Cibitung (19.7 km) was inaugurated today and will soon be operational.

Vice President Ma’ruf Amin hopes that this toll road can reduce travel time from Bogor to Bekasi to only 30-45 minutes, and the integration of the Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road with other toll road networks in Greater Jakarta (Jabodetabek) can enhance connectivity between areas, thus promoting efficiency and effectiveness of economic activities in the Greater Jakarta area.

The Cimanggis-Cibitung Toll Road complements the JORR 2 network with a total length of 111 km, where other sections from Cengkareng - Kunciran - Serpong - Cinere - Jagorawi - Cimanggis, then Cibitung - Cilincing, which were previously operational, cover a length of 91.3 km.

“JORR 2 is finally fully connected from Cengkareng to Cilincing. If you want to travel from west to east, you don’t need to enter Jakarta first; you can use this toll road directly to Cikampek. This will reduce congestion within Jakarta city,” said Minister Basuki.

@kemenpupr

Tuesday, 09. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

I don't ♥ emoji characters in names

There are a number of places with ♥ and ❤️, and all their variants, in their names. This wiki guidance notwithstanding, I do think it is appropriate because this is the name of the place on signage, but it definitely makes it hard to search for stuff.

Official documents and urls for these locations mostly just use words, like “heart”, in place of the symbol because it is simpler and tec

There are a number of places with ♥ and ❤️, and all their variants, in their names. This wiki guidance notwithstanding, I do think it is appropriate because this is the name of the place on signage, but it definitely makes it hard to search for stuff.

Official documents and urls for these locations mostly just use words, like “heart”, in place of the symbol because it is simpler and technically, or legally, required.

These hearts really are only the tip of the iceberg there are thousands of OSM entities with emojis in their names.

I am inclined to leave the emoji in the name tag but use the name:en tag to expand these emoji to words. Or should i just bring these names into “compliance” as the wiki indicates that emojis should be avoided in names.

Any thoughts on this?


Stuff I hate about sidewalk mapping

Stuff I hate about sidewalk mapping

I have a certain… love-hate relationship with separte sidewalk mapping. On one hand, they do allow for a more complex mapping like specifying the type of separation between sidewalks and carriageway, easier to specify the surface of sidewalks (especially if the corresponding carriageway is split up), etc. On the other hand, they make routing (potentially) more

Stuff I hate about sidewalk mapping

I have a certain… love-hate relationship with separte sidewalk mapping. On one hand, they do allow for a more complex mapping like specifying the type of separation between sidewalks and carriageway, easier to specify the surface of sidewalks (especially if the corresponding carriageway is split up), etc. On the other hand, they make routing (potentially) more complex (it’s complicated, actually) which is why I generally see them more useful on busy roads and outside settlements where you don’t expect spontaneous crossings. One thing what really fuels my issues with them, though, is just how careless a lot of users are with them, that one should go and map them however one wants despite the potential problems which can arise.

This is ultimately what I really hate about them: That (typically inexperienced) users go and start mapping sidewalks however they want (that is, draw them as they exist on a map). It’s such a big issue because it actually breaks routing, particularly if you map around blocks which usually only have limited official crossings and in turn a lot of virtual paths have to be created. Some pretty bad ones are such sloppy that they ignore all the warnings in their editor (be it two unconnected but crossing ways, way-building intersections or isolated ways).

All in all, here are my personal faux pas you can make with them (aside from ignoring all the warnings in your editor of choice):

Not detaching ways from the carriageway

This is a classic “just draw sidewalk” phenomenon: Draw the sidewalk but keep the connections from the now carriageway.

Basically, highways with no separately mapped sidewalks tend to have paths which lead out of them. They’re mostly real paths but have to connect with the main highway in order to be connected for pedestrians (they basically have an implied footway=link). One justification for sidewalk mapping is to improve routing (which is a valid motivation) and they definitively help in this regard in at least major streets. However, not detaching footways from the carriageway doesn’t do much favour because it makes it feel like one simply drew them however one wants with no regard to the actual routing and existing paths.

Obviously, there are exceptions to the rule like when there are either no kerbs throughout the street or they’re a painted lane but at that point, the sidewalk mapping should be extra considerate since the sidewalk is basically part of the carriageway, and lane-based or kerb-less tagging is a better approach instead of adding a way which arguable doesn’t really exist (to put it into consideration, some medians aren’t enough of a barrier to split a highway into dual carriageways) or there is a real connection from the sidewalk like a lowered kerb which should be mapped regardless on how useful they are for pedestrians (maybe it’s a driveway in disguise?).

Leaving isolated sidewalk islands

This is the biggest faux pas one can ever make in sidewalk mapping and is the opposite case of the first point: The lack of crossings through the carriageway.

This comes in two favours: Unconnected crossing nodes and minor street sidewalk mapping but they both are clear symptoms of the “just draw sidewalk” syndrome.

Part of the reason why I don’t really like sidewalk tagging is because they’re often used on lesser streets with limited benefits compared to the efforts they take. Most notable, crossings on such streets have a tendency to be relatively hidden (though with the increased use of kerb cuts and tactile pavings they come with, this problem is lessened a bit) or are informal by default since no kerb is lowered or at least uses the same colour as the remaining kerbs nor are most crossings marked there either.

But even the former is an issue because not only does it mess up routing but moreover, the information is already there. A clear cut example of “You had one job…”.

Not updating sidewalk tags

A small example but a pretty good symptom is to simply not update the sidewalk tags to separately mapped ones. The purpose of them is simple: It tells pedestrians whether a road has a sidewalk or not as well as on which side they have to go but moreover, whether it exists as its own way. This is done for the following purposes: * It clarifies that a footway next to a road is indeed its sidewalk and not a separate path (which does happen sometimes). * It tells quality controls and tools like StreetComplete that the information are already provided somewhere else, thus preventing duplicate data (e.g. surface of sidewalk quests). * It also tells routers to depriotise the carriageway and use the footway next to it for routing, especially because depending on the country, it is (generally) illegal to walk on the carriageway if a corresponding sidepath exists (note that although routers will priotise sidepaths over the carriageway already, sidewalk:*=separate strengthens this even further and should avoid routing pedestrians over the carriageway in 99% of all time).

Inconsistent mapping

Now, most of the issues were basically multiple sides of the same coin (same die?) but there are other sidewalk mapping habits which get on my nerves for a bit. One example is how I’ve recently “completed” a lot of sidewalks. Basically, how the sidewalks were mapped were pretty chaothic as the arbitrarily ended in the middle of nowhere, they’re drawn on and off or the street has its sidewalks mapped all over the place.

The main cause of it aren’t necessarily always sidewalk drawers (but they still are guilty of them) but mapping sidewalk with extra rules like permitting cyclists on them. The problem with it is that this is a routing issue as routers may not necessarily take the infrastructure into account. It also looks pretty ugly in my eyes. Conversely, it’s sometimes better to simply use sidewalk / cycleway tags if it results in a net benefit even when the preferred local solution is to create a separate way when that happens. An important factor is that the streets have to be split up anyway for cycleway tagging. I recommend doing that for more minor streets, though.

Others instead do it by starting somewhere, then ending it on the next crossing or driveway and someone else does the same, never consider to connect these sidewalks. It’s at that point the sidewalk mapping gets quite ridiculous and one should take the effort to either just finish it or to simply not do it.

Examples where sidewalks end with a sharp turn are particularly infamous and should be fixed because this is where we get to…

Lack of balance between reality and abstraction

As a map, OSM takes some limitations on what it can and can’t display and so all the data stored there is a simplification of the real world (there is a reason why the tagging for buildings and indoor mapping have “simplified” in their name). At the same time, some do want to map data more or less realistically (i.e. micromapping) and OSM provides different tools for different levels of abstraction.

Overall, OSM supports abstraction like placing traffic islands as nodes instead of temporarily splitting a carriageway into two (though it admittingly is better suited for shorter islands) and the decision to map sidewalks as separate ways or not is another good example thereof (i.e. not doing it being more abstract than mapping them as their own ways).

To go with the theme of sidewalk mapping, another good example is the intersection of two highways and one of the sidewalks: You can follow the physical sidewalk or draw a line parallel to the intersection; one automatically handles crossings, the other requires you to add the crossings yourself.

This is where we get to sidewalk tagging: I hate when the former happens on a street which has no sidewalks tagged as it gives off an appearance that the sidewalk tagging is incomplete (depending on the street, more than it is now for sure). Basically, if you follow the route from separate sidewalks to tagged sidewalks, you’re essentially taking a sharp turn on the side rather than main street, potentially even taking a crossing way you never took. Now, this isn’t all avoidable (an official crossing might be sometimes further away from the main road than otherwise) but it’s still looks rather ugly IMO.

Another example is ending a sidewalk: This could be done either with a sharp turn, drawing up to the next crossing or diagonally for a smoother transition. None of the solutions are perfect but some are worse than others. Basically, by creating a sharp turn, it makes it look like the sidewalk ends abruptly into the street instead of appearing like its continuing onwards. Of course, a very potential issue is that one shouldn’t just end sidewalks with no reason (see above). Slip lanes are a particular offender as it’s quite common to draw them only up to a crossing but not continuing them further regardless on whether the sidewalk physically continues or not which looks… bad (of course, the alternative is to end the sidewalk in the middle of the street which I also complained before but I prefer a smooth transition for consistency). It also leaves a potential danger from roads being (unnecessarily) split up by certain mappers (incidentally another example of lack of abstraction) even though the current tagging is relatively fine (in that routers are unlikely to route pedestrians over a carriageway, especially if the leading road has sidewalk:*=separate).

This is, admittingly, the most subjective of all bad habits, considering that all solutions are basically bad unless all sidewalks are mapped separately. I still feel like some practices are worse than others.

There also is a special (rare) case where the sidewalk mapping is drawn as accurately as possible. Aside from being able to leave isolated ways (see above), it also results in (IMO) ugly dead-ends (like curving into a corner or ending where the kerb ends) and lack of connections (no connection to the carriageway), destroying. If you truly want a a more accurate representation of the sidewalk, either map it as an area or draw the kerbs which separates it from the carriageway (and use the building properties for the other border). Vanilla Carto / OSM Standard typically won’t render highway areas (that is area:highway=*, not highway=pedestrian, highway=footway and highway=service as areas) but other renderers like OSM2World can.

The conlusion

The reason why I created this rant is because I’ve been recently fixing a lot of sidewalks. In fact, some of them were so bad that I’ve deleted them with no regret but I’ve done that only three times because they were so bad, it’s easier to simply start them over in the future when sidewalk in these are mapped separately than fixing the mess in the present (one being wildy drawn sidewalks with a lot of unconnected connections, the other two being such isolated, it made no sense whatsoever to keep them). This is an extreme case, though, and I much rather want to fix them by drawing higher quality sidewalks but it also makes me wonder on what the mappers were thinking when they were drawing them.

It shows that I don’t really hate separate sidewalk mapping but it’s very easy to get them done in the wrong way than simply using sidewalk=*. As such, I’m working on a guide on how I map sidewalks which includes explaining some of the stuff I mentioned in detail (and also more politely), stuff I left out or at the very least very briefly here but also examples on how I map thing which might be good practices to take over.


Day 33 and 34 - Villages Renz, Slatinjë, Radesh and Gradec

It seems that I forgot to add a Diary Entry yesterday.

Yesterday I mapped the village Renz and the surrounding areas.

Today I started with Demiraj which was fully mapped (Thanks to DenisJu which has done an amazing job mapping Shkodra and the surroundings) so I moved next on the list.

I mapped the village Slatinjë which was really tiny, so I decided to map also Radesh

It seems that I forgot to add a Diary Entry yesterday.

Yesterday I mapped the village Renz and the surrounding areas.

Today I started with Demiraj which was fully mapped (Thanks to DenisJu which has done an amazing job mapping Shkodra and the surroundings) so I moved next on the list.

I mapped the village Slatinjë which was really tiny, so I decided to map also Radesh and Gradec.

“#100villagesin100days #day33 #day34”


Sam Wilson

Geogeeks July 2024

Fremantle
2024 July 9 (Tuesday), 2:36PM
· OSM · meetups ·

The next Geogeeks hack night is this week. I've not been to one for a few months (because I've been away), but I'm looking forward to seeing everyone again, and hopefully doing some more work on OpenHistoricalMap and the tramways of Fremantle, or at least continuing to catalogue which maps w

Fremantle

· OSM · meetups ·

The next Geogeeks hack night is this week. I've not been to one for a few months (because I've been away), but I'm looking forward to seeing everyone again, and hopefully doing some more work on OpenHistoricalMap and the tramways of Fremantle, or at least continuing to catalogue which maps will be useful to do that.

And OSGeo Oceania beer.


OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Continuing to spot what appears to be manmade geoglyphs in the Nazca Area.

I am finding shapes and believing that I have discovered a very important pattern not completely mentioned earlier. Using those principals in those pattern shapes many geoglyphs are appearing over and over. Some are of animals and others of what appears to be humans. Most see to use the natural hillsides and valleys and then some modifications to the terrain to bring out the features with the

I am finding shapes and believing that I have discovered a very important pattern not completely mentioned earlier. Using those principals in those pattern shapes many geoglyphs are appearing over and over. Some are of animals and others of what appears to be humans. Most see to use the natural hillsides and valleys and then some modifications to the terrain to bring out the features with the figures. These are not easy to spot, as I have been trying to spot some for quite a while, only recently appearing of which I can’t unsee.

At some point I’ll make some kind of formal presentation but for now I am continuing to lay shapes down.

Incidentally, I am not using any AI or Google Earth enhancers of any kind. Most shapes are not indicated, and some may be part of a previously discovered shape. If I see shapes over shapes, I’ll try to add a second line type.

Monday, 08. July 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

From Mapper to Mentor/Organiser: My Guru Fellowship Journey

For years, I’ve been an active contributor to OpenStreetMap (OSM) – starting as a mapper in college (2017) and evolving into a trainer, leading over 30 trainings and reaching more than 1500 people. Recently, I took my commitment to the next level as a Trainer Fellow with Open Mapping Hub Asia Pacific (OMH AP). This 5-month journey wasn’t just about delivering training; it was about wearing a new

For years, I’ve been an active contributor to OpenStreetMap (OSM) – starting as a mapper in college (2017) and evolving into a trainer, leading over 30 trainings and reaching more than 1500 people. Recently, I took my commitment to the next level as a Trainer Fellow with Open Mapping Hub Asia Pacific (OMH AP). This 5-month journey wasn’t just about delivering training; it was about wearing a new hat – that of an organizer.

The Guru fellowship involved five trainings, including three online, one in-person (which I’ll delve into), and one where I acted as a support trainer. While every training experience is unique, this in-person workshop held a special place.

The in-person training titled “Map and Chat: Open Mapping Hands-on Workshop for DRR 2024”, held on April 28-29 2024, was designed for bachelor students with diverse backgrounds in Kathmandu, Nepal, in collaboration with Open Mapping Hub Asia-Pacific, Sendai Stakeholders Children and Youth Group, UN Major Group for Children and Youth (UNMGCY) and ALIN Foundation Nepal. The workshop aimed to equip them with hands-on open mapping tools and knowledge for disaster risk reduction (DRR).

Stepping Up: The Organizer’s Hat

While I was accustomed to crafting training materials and schedules, organizing demanded a whole new set of skills. The in-person aspect brought a new layer of complexity of logistics. Suddenly, I was creating Google Forms, counting water bottles and pens, designing posters and certificates, budgeting and managing finances and also analyzing participants’ backgrounds to tailor content effectively (as I usually do as a trainer. Gone were the days of solely focusing on the curriculum.)

The two-day workshop started with an introduction to open mapping tools and DRR concepts. The 22 participants came from diverse backgrounds – public health, agriculture, environmental science, and more. We provided training on both remote and field mapping techniques. Day two focused on solidifying knowledge through quizzes and interactive group discussions focusing on how OSM data could benefit their specific fields, mapping for DRR preparation and response, and how to attract more volunteers from their diverse backgrounds. Participants at training session Trainers

The highlight of the workshop and my favourite moment was seeing the participants present their ideas after the group discussions. It was a testament to their newfound skills and how they could be applied in their respective disciplines. Partcipants presenting Group Discussions Output

Following the training, a group of participants participated in a week-long mapathon focusing on DRR. They mapped areas affected by floods, and landslides, and contributed to various global projects remotely. The collective effort resulted in mapping over 4000 buildings and 250 km of roads – a testament to the power of this initiative and the impact extended beyond the mere workshop. Group Photo OSM_DRR

A Transformative Experience

This fellowship experience was really transformative. I didn’t just organize and lead the training – I facilitated a pathway for participants to create a tangible impact (mapping over 4000 buildings and 250 km roads ). As a proud outcome, I’ve also developed an interdisciplinary training module that’s adaptable and replicable, making it easier to train interdisciplinary participants in the future. A big thank you to Open Mapping Hub Asia Pacific and Mikko, OM Guru Rabina, training requestor/co-organiser Sagar, venue partner King’s College and everyone involved in making this possible. I am now even more excited to continue promoting open mapping and empowering others to contribute.


ATV trails

About a year ago, I actually encountered a use of highway=road as I aligned roads and added a bit more detail to the area at the south end of Mendocino National Forest. And what is a “road”? A placeholder! “Undefined” is actually quite defined comparatively. I investigated what it should be a placeholder for and found it was marking an ATV trail. It had been there a few years and could survive a

About a year ago, I actually encountered a use of highway=road as I aligned roads and added a bit more detail to the area at the south end of Mendocino National Forest. And what is a “road”? A placeholder! “Undefined” is actually quite defined comparatively. I investigated what it should be a placeholder for and found it was marking an ATV trail. It had been there a few years and could survive a few more.

Since JOSM doesn’t even seem to know one might want to set a value called “atv”, perhaps I should explain. Also called a “quad”, these narrow little four wheeled things can’t quite go everywhere a motorcycle can go, but they’ll get a lot more places than a 4x4 vehicle. There were 3 wheeled ones (probably still are in other places) but they were banned because they killed people more often due to rolling more easily. People grumbled at first. Three wheels is more fun! But they seem happy now. It hurts to roll over. Often tagging goes a little like this:

highway=[um]
atv=yes/designated
motorcar=no
maxwidth=1.27

(No side-by-sides, as the signs in Colorado often said! Those are often known as ATV or UTV.)

But is [um] a path or a track?

Well, the wiki on “path” is quite clear: “A highway=path is not for use by four-wheeled (two-track) vehicles.” Then it muddles a little: “A path-like way where four-wheeled vehicles are allowed, is likely better tagged as a highway=track or highway=service.” Only “likely”.

Meanwhile, on the wiki on “track” we find that track is “generally not appropriate” for “A trail or path that is not wide enough for a typical four-wheeled motor vehicle.” There is a footnote to clarify this: “A “typical four-wheeled motor vehicle” means a general purpose or average motor vehicle commonly used in a given region. The size and capability of what is considered a typical, common, or average vehicle varies around the world.”

Both are very sensible definitions. Both leave no space for the ATV trail in an area where the “motorcar” is the typical vehicle. But with the wiggle, it could go to either.

I did come to ATV trail while mapping an area I’d been in eastern Nevada and settled on marking it as “path” for the simple reason that one would typically have to stop and change vehicles to drive it legally, even if their standard transport is high clearance, short wheelbase. However, it doesn’t do a good job of differentiating those routes from the very different vehicle=no paths of the wilderness beside it.

There does seem to be a wiki page for atv and it’s badly written and doesn’t think much of proposals. It decidedly comes down on the side of using “track”, but without any justification. I’d really rather not sully my precious “paths” (see user name with “hike” in it) with the likes of an ATV trail, but must admit “path” really may be the best fit. Sorry wiki page editor. People will try to drive it with their Hummer if you mark it as a track.

I find myself wanting a… highway=narrow_track, perhaps. (What’s just one more? Proliferate further!)

Still, motorcycle trails will always have the above problem. This is what access tags are for. And a good renderer.

Poking around Overpass for things marked atv=designated, I’m finding a lot of tracks, so perhaps others haven’t come to the same conclusions I have, or they read that wiki page. I’m finding a lot of other modes being “designated” on those tracks. That’s probably not right since “foot” and “bicycle” are usually “allowed, discouraged” by the Forest Service on their ATV and motorcycle trails. For atv=yes, I see more of a mix, and some of the tracks do allow larger vehicles. Non-standard tagging all over the place. There’s a “4wd” (instead of “4wd_only” or “ohv”) and “car” (instead of “motorcar”). It’s all a muddled mess.

What is typically used with both motorcar=no and atv=yes? I should be able to make Overpass do this? I sure can’t make Taginfo. What is the “correct” way if one really thinks about it?

Fundamentally, neither fits. “Road.” I understand.

Just don’t go marking “Jeep trails” as “paths” the way the Forest Service sometimes does. I see the sense of blurring the differentiation between “path” and “track” as CyclOSM does. Also of having a map focused on one transport type. I just wish there was a pull down to change between transport types.


OpenStreetMap Blog

SotM 2024: Call for Posters

Did you miss the call for general and academic presentation? Don’t worry! You still can still showcase your project or map visualisation at the State of the Map 2024! The Call for Poster for SotM 2024 is now open! Your poster could show how well your home region is mapped; it could be a beautiful […]

Did you miss the call for general and academic presentation? Don’t worry! You still can still showcase your project or map visualisation at the State of the Map 2024! The Call for Poster for SotM 2024 is now open!

Your poster could show how well your home region is mapped; it could be a beautiful new style or map. It might focus on a community project or statistics; it might be a poster explaining and inviting people to OpenStreetMap. What is important is that we want it to be about OSM. We are also welcoming academic posters about research around OpenStreetMap data.

For inspiration, see SotM 2022 posters – 2022.stateofthemap.org/posters/

Submission requirements

  • The Poster should be for A0 size (841×1189 mm)
  • The Poster should be related to OpenStreetMap
  • The Poster should be open, innovative and transparent (no-copying)
  • The Poster must be your own work (individual, team or institution)
  • The Poster should be under an open license (CC-BY-SA 3.0 or later recommended or CC0 )
  • Maximum two entries per person, team or institution

How to enter

  • Upload your poster via https://files.osmfoundation.org/s/5gMewMw6FTFHF7A
  • File size maximum 30-40 MB
  • Format: PDF
  • Please email sotm [at] openstreetmap.org with a description of your poster. For example, the background of the project or whatever you consider important to mention in the context of the poster – all that you would tell people if you show them your poster. We will publish this text together with the poster on the SotM website.
  • Please also mention the filename of the uploaded poster in your email, so that we can know which of the uploaded posters is yours.

Timeline

  • Deadline: 25 August 2024
The SotM team hopes to shortlist up to 20 posters that will be published on our website and some other SotM channels under CC BY SA 3.0 (or later)

The State of the Map Working Group

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The State of the Map conference is the annual, international conference of OpenStreetMap, organised by the OpenStreetMap Foundation. The OpenStreetMap Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation, formed to support the OpenStreetMap Project. It is dedicated to encouraging the growth, development and distribution of free geospatial data for anyone to use and share. The OpenStreetMap Foundation owns and maintains the infrastructure of the OpenStreetMap project, is financially supported by membership fees and donations, and organises the annual, international State of the Map conference. Our volunteer Working Groups and small core staff work to support the OpenStreetMap project. Join the OpenStreetMap Foundation for just £15 a year or for free if you are an active OpenStreetMap contributor.

OpenStreetMap was founded in 2004 and is an international project to create a free map  of the world. To do so, we, thousands of volunteers, collect data about roads, railways, rivers, forests, buildings and a lot more worldwide. Our map data can be downloaded for free by everyone and used for any  purpose – including commercial usage. It is possible to produce your own  maps which highlight certain features, to calculate routes etc. OpenStreetMap is increasingly used when one needs maps which can be very  quickly, or easily, updated.