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Sunday, 29. January 2023

weeklyOSM

weeklyOSM 653

17/01/2023-23/01/2023 osmimgur : See tagged imgur images on OSM [1] | map data © OpenStreetMap contributors Mapping User bradrh consulted the US Forest Service Motor Use Maps to update motor vehicle access restrictions on forest roads and trails in several national forests. Bryce Cogswell (bryceco) listed every OpenStreetMapper that has managed to map for more…

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17/01/2023-23/01/2023

lead picture

osmimgur : See tagged imgur images on OSM [1] | map data © OpenStreetMap contributors

Mapping

  • User bradrh consulted the US Forest Service Motor Use Maps to update motor vehicle access restrictions on forest roads and trails in several national forests.
  • Bryce Cogswell (bryceco) listed every OpenStreetMapper that has managed to map for more than a thousand days without a break.
  • Lejun described how to merge data from different sources into OpenStreetMap. He explained the different tools and methods, including the JOSM plugin UtilsPlugin2.
  • Christoph Hormann wrote a blog post describing the problems with the name key and promised to try to propose a possible solution in his next post.
  • Tomas_J has provided
    pictures and suggested tagging for a few Slovak-specific features.
  • Valerie Norton (valhikes) has summarised her mapping activity around Gunnison, Colorado between February and September 2022. Details of each hike, with lots of photos, are posted on her blog.
  • Voting on the suggestion to announce proposals on the OSM Community forum, as well as the tagging mailing list, has closed. It was approved with 48 votes for, 5 votes against and 0 abstentions.

Community

  • OpenStreetMap recently hit a milestone with more than 10 million user accounts. The milestone was discussed on r/openstreetmap. It should be noted that only about 1.9 million of these accounts have been used to make a map edit.
  • Daniel Capilla (dcapillae) has created a tutorial on how to make a metrominuto (a schematic map of a municipality or city that represents the distances between its main points and the average time it takes to walk between them) of your area of interest.
  • Mevesscarto gave us an update on their progress to armchair map the French department Côtes d’Armor.
  • watmildon explained the JOSM and MapWithAI workflow that they are using to add missing street addresses to OSM.

OpenStreetMap Foundation

  • Get to know the new OSMF Board. In December 2022, four new members were elected to the OpenStreetMap Foundation Board, complementing the three members already serving. The new members, Arnalie Vicario, Craig Allan, Mateusz Konieczny, and Sarah Hoffmann, have joined Guillaume Rischard, Mikel Maron, and Roland Olbricht.

Local chapter news

  • Nominations for the OpenStreetMap US 2023 Board Elections are now open. The OSM US blog has more details if you are interested.

Education

  • UN Mappers has launched the UN Maps Learning Hub, a self-learning platform accessible to anyone interested in the OpenStreetMap project. Courses will be available in several languages and will cover aspects of topographic and humanitarian mapping. The OSM Basics course is already available.

OSM research

  • With the release of the OSHDB (OpenStreetMap History Database) Version 1 for spatio-temporal analysis, the HeiGIT team at Heidelberg University has reached an important milestone. The data is open to everyone, whether they belong to journalism, science or humanitarian organisations. The ohsome dashboard allows you to analyse OSM temporal data for any region. A significant enhancement is the new OSHDB filters that allow practitioners to filter entities by the shape of the geometry (one measure of quality often discussed by the OSM community).
  • GeoObserver has published the third part of its ‘Meierloch’ trilogy on the distribution of surnames and their visualisation on a map.

switch2OSM

  • Roberto Brazzelli described how the municipality of Limone (Piemonte, Italy) provides a map of amenities using uMap. Data is maintained in OSM by council staff, but updates are quality controlled via QGIS with data cached in Google Sheets from Overpass queries.

Software

  • Kshitij Raj Sharma has created ‘OpenStreetMap Stats Generator’, which uses osmium to analyse the change files from OSM and generate statistics in different file formats such as csv, json, and jpg. Results are also being tweeted. A second bot follows the recent trends on OSM and retweets the findings with hashtags #osm, #openstreetmap and #hotosm every three hours.
  • rtnf asked why the OpenStreetMap Stats Generator needs an OpenStreetMap login and proposed a lightweight version without the need for credentials.

Programming

  • [1] rtnf, inspired by posts on imagery collected by MapComplete (we reported earlier), has created a web app that randomly samples MapComplete images. In his blog, he explained how to visualise tagged imgur images on OSM.
  • Jake Coppinger reported on his efforts writing a vector tile server for osm2streets to provide lane-accurate street maps with OpenStreetMap. Jake also revealed that his Safe Cycling Map now works for the entire world.
  • Tobin Bradley recorded a screencast video that captures how protomaps is used to create a PMTiles file, a single file vector tiles format, and integrate it into a MapLibre demo map. This setup allows you to create vector tile maps with static infrastructure.
  • starsep explained how Bing StreetSide imagery can be used for mapping with JOSM.

Did you know …

  • … about the shop suffix for repair? You can use this to specify services available for computers, bicycles, shoes and more, as tooted by OSM Tourism.
  • … Thomas Gratier’s comprehensive listing of map-related things?
  • … the OSM Welcome tool, hosted by OSM-Belgium? This app helps identify new contributors to OSM in a given area, how many edits they’ve made, and their preferred editor. It also keeps track of which users have been sent a welcome message via the site.
  • … the comparative overview of possibly every OSM-related Android app?

Other “geo” things

  • The Equal Earth physical map of the world is now available in German, thanks to the work of Simon Scherrer.
  • Devin Lea has started a new weekly social media hashtag #MapPromptMonday with a different theme each week. Last week the theme was using colour-blind friendly symbology. Upcoming themes have been listed.

Upcoming Events

Where What Online When Country
IJmuiden OSM Nederland bijeenkomst (online) 2023-01-28 flag
南区 京都!街歩き!マッピングパーティ:第35回 六孫王神社 2023-01-29 flag
Windsor OSM Windsor-Essex Monthly Meetup 2023-01-31 flag
San Jose South Bay Map Night 2023-02-01 flag
Hannover OSM-Stammtisch Hannover 2023-02-06 flag
MapRoulette Monthly Community Meeting 2023-02-07
OSMF Engineering Working Group meeting 2023-02-07
Strasbourg Mapathon CartONG 2023-02-07 flag
City of Westminster Missing Maps London Mapathon 2023-02-07 flag
Stuttgart Stuttgarter Stammtisch 2023-02-07 flag
Zürich OSM-Stammtisch 2023-02-08 flag
Salt Lake City OSM Utah Monthly Map Night 2023-02-09 flag
London London social pub meet-up 2023-02-08 flag
München Münchner OSM-Treffen 2023-02-08 flag
Neufchâteau OpenStreetMap – Réunion à Neufchâteau 2023-02-09 flag
左京区 京都!街歩き!マッピングパーティ:第36回 金地院 2023-02-12 flag
København OSMmapperCPH 2023-02-12 flag
San Jose South Bay Map Night 2023-02-15 flag
Karlsruhe Stammtisch Karlsruhe 2023-02-15 flag
Olomouc únorový olomoucký mapathon 2023-02-16 flag

Note:
If you like to see your event here, please put it into the OSM calendar. Only data which is there, will appear in weeklyOSM.

This weeklyOSM was produced by ChristopherGS, Kasey2, MatthiasMatthias, Nordpfeil, PierZen, SK53, SeverinGeo, Strubbl, TheSwavu, barefootstache, derFred.
We welcome link suggestions for the next issue via this form and look forward to your contributions.


OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Restos de cruceiro no Pireiro, Louredo

Situados na beira dun muro dunha viña, no lugar do Pireiro, estes anacos dun vello cruceiro son o testemuño máis antigo dun cruceiro en Louredo. Este situábase na Alfarrapa, preto da Telleira, e é un modelo único no pobo. Dispuña das imaxes do Crucificado, no alto, por riba dunha caveira, ós pés da cruz, onde estaban dúas imaxes máis: san Xoán e a Virxe. Digo que é único porque os cruceiros que

Situados na beira dun muro dunha viña, no lugar do Pireiro, estes anacos dun vello cruceiro son o testemuño máis antigo dun cruceiro en Louredo. Este situábase na Alfarrapa, preto da Telleira, e é un modelo único no pobo. Dispuña das imaxes do Crucificado, no alto, por riba dunha caveira, ós pés da cruz, onde estaban dúas imaxes máis: san Xoán e a Virxe. Digo que é único porque os cruceiros que viñeron despois son todos moi parecidos entre eles, sen imaxe algunha. Se o da Torre resulta ser o máis antigo en pé, podería ser o modelo que se seguí para os da Alfarrapa e Tabolado, ambos da autoría de don Juan Míguez Domínguez.

Este vello cruceiro caeu por mor dun carro que chocou con el, segundo unha versión, ou foi derribado por algúns republicanos en datas cercanas ó alzamento nacional, segundo outras fontes orais. O párroco, don Esteban, decidíu por os restos no muro da súa viña, ben visibles, e restauralo. Nunca pasou tal. Levantouse un novo cruceiro. Os restos están ben visibles no muro da antiga viña de don Esteban, enfronte dun cruce de camiños, así que poden visitarse e fotografar con toda facilidade.

Máis en:

  1. Notas sobre os cruceiros de Louredo
  2. Notas sobre restos do cruceiro no Pireiro

note-viewer: editing, logins, servers

In case you wanted to use my note viewer with another openstreetmap-website-based project - now you can. Although most likely you didn’t because there aren’t many of them and they don’t use notes actively. Additional projects that note-viewer is already configured to work with are:

  • OpenHistoricalMap (note-viewer link) - without map tiles unfortunately, because they don’t have ras

In case you wanted to use my note viewer with another openstreetmap-website-based project - now you can. Although most likely you didn’t because there aren’t many of them and they don’t use notes actively. Additional projects that note-viewer is already configured to work with are:

It’s not a surprise that notes aren’t heavily used in these projects. Often you place a note where the map diverges from reality and you can’t edit the map at the moment. But neither OpenHistoricalMap nor OpenGeofiction represent something that is currently real. Right now OpenGeofiction has less than 100 notes, and it’s not obvious if that project even needs notes. Maybe they might use notes to coordinate editing of their collaborative territories?

Now you can also edit the loaded and selected notes by commenting, closing or reopening them. This might be useful to deal with several notes at once. Actually it was one of the original plans for note-viewer. The situations where it’s helpful include someone modifying a lot of notes without a good reason. For example, users sometimes close existing notes without making any map modifications or providing reasons why the notes are irrelevant. They may do this because open notes look wrong (red with x marks) and closed notes look right (green with ticks). Closing a note may look like confirming it. Probably that’s why users sometimes close even their own notes without making any edits. Now it’s possible to quickly deal with such note modifications by searching for a given username, followed by filtering for user’s close actions, selecting all filtered notes and reopening them.

Editing the notes most likely requires you to log in first. This is true for OpenStreetMap but I haven’t checked other servers. To log in or change a server, currently you have to open the About tab. Later I’ll replace it with a menu button. You can also configure note-viewer to use your own osm server there.

Saturday, 28. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Using GNIS data to find potential additions and corrections

I’ve started a new project working with watmildon. While we were working together on applying the USGS Sq___ name changes to OSM we noticed was that there were often features in OSM that were out of sync with official name changes that happened years ago.

That got us thinking about walking through the USGS GNIS data set to find places where names had changed and OSM could be updated. Aft

I’ve started a new project working with watmildon. While we were working together on applying the USGS Sq___ name changes to OSM we noticed was that there were often features in OSM that were out of sync with official name changes that happened years ago.

That got us thinking about walking through the USGS GNIS data set to find places where names had changed and OSM could be updated. After all, there are many features in OSM that have gnis:feature_id (and similar) tags that can be directly matched back to the GNIS data set.

After kicking the idea around for a while, we recently started writing some code. I’ve been working on a matching engine in C# that matches records from GNIS to OSM by Feature ID. The code also looks for likely matches where the feature name, primary tags, and geometry are close to the information from GNIS. So far the results are pretty good, but we’re still working on improving the matching.

Meanwhile, watmildon did some large scale statistical analysis on a local PBF file to look at the scale and scope of the problem. The results were very interesting!

Of the 2.3 million features in GNIS, there are only 1 million corresponding features with GNIS IDs in OSM. Some portion of these are surely existing features that just don’t have the gnis:feature_id (or similar) tags. But given our manual review of results from the matching code, there are a lot of GNIS features that are not present in OSM at all.

That’s not too much of a surprise. Some of the most common types of missing features are Streams, Valleys, Lakes, Springs, and Ridges – all things that not widely mapped in the US.

GNIS recently archived the feature classes for civil names and man-made features. About half of the 1.3 million GNIS records that don’t have corresponding features in OSM are for those archived features. You might reasonably wonder whether it’s worth tagging the archived features in OSM. But that leaves about 600,000 current GNIS features that aren’t fully tagged in OSM. And a large portion of those are likely not mapped at all.

At this point, we’re still working on improving our tools, collecting, and analyzing the data. There do seem to be some opportunities for some automated tag cleanup, and if that makes sense we’ll follow community practices for anything like that.

But fixing the untagged/missing features is going to require manual review and there are too many features for us do that alone. We’ll have to keep working to find ways to enlist the rest of the community to help!


Bing Imagery Anomaly

Can someone explain why this happened? It seems there is some weird fisheye lens thing going on here.

www.openstreetmap.org/edit#map=19/42.71511/-108.98850

Can someone explain why this happened? It seems there is some weird fisheye lens thing going on here.

https://www.openstreetmap.org/edit#map=19/42.71511/-108.98850


Plombier Urgent Belgique

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Call Plombier Urgent at 0465-489.252 for unclogging pipes or plumbing repairs, water leaks and sanitary repairs. Professional service in Brussels and all regions of Belgium 24/7. Plombier Urgent is a professional plumbing assistance company in Brussels (Brussel) and all regions of Belgium competent in all types of unclogging pipes, water leak repair. We provide a plumbing repair service in Brussels and all regions of Belgium…… read for more information….@ https://plombier-urgent.be/


osm2pgsql

Release 1.8.0

We are happy to announce the new release 1.8.0 of osm2pgsql.

We are happy to announce the new release 1.8.0 of osm2pgsql.

The largest change is the addition of much more flexible index support in the flex output. The table definitions have a new (optional) field called indexes now which takes a list of index definitions. If the field is not there, we fall back to what we did before and create a GIST index on the only/first geometry column of a table. But you can also define any kind of index you want: define which index method (BTREE, GIST, …) to use on which columns, define WHERE clauses and expression indexes and much more. See the flex-config/indexes.lua Lua config for some usage examples and the manual for all the details. You can also force osm2pgsql to always build the id indexes which are normally only built in slim mode.

The gazetteer output and the command line option --with-forward-dependencies are deprecated in this release and will be removed soon. They were only needed for Nominatim which switched to using the flex output recently.

Here are the other changes:

  • Fix a problem when using osm2pgsql with a projection other than WGS84 (EPSG:4326) or Web Mercator (EPSG:3857) which made the program really slow.
  • New pole_of_inaccessibility() Lua function to generate reasonably good label points from polygons. (This function is currently marked as experimental, which means it can change without notice at any time.)
  • Performance improvement for very small updates. Don’t spin up multiple threads when there are less then 100 objects to process, because the extra overhead is not worth it.
  • Implement and use our own JSON writer. This removes the dependency on RapidJSON which hasn’t seen a new release since 2016.
  • Add more checks (or does some checks earlier) to make sure your database uses UTF-8 encoding and that necessary database extensions are loaded and index methods, schemas and tablespaces you refer to in the config are actually available.
  • A lot of code needed to be updated so it works correctly with any of the recent versions of the fmt library.

As always there were lots of code cleanups across the board, but especially in code accessing the database and in the C++/Lua glue code to make it more flexible and easier to use internally.

Friday, 27. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

شرکت فنی مهندسی راشا سازه ژیوار

تاسیس 1400/11/03 سهامی خاص سرمایه اولیه ** تجربه کاری 1.اصلاح هندسی میدان مادر 2اصلاح هندسی میدان نگین 3ایجاد گذر گاه عابر پیاده 4 فرهنگ سازی ترافیک بر مبحث شهر ساری نوین 5…..

تاسیس 1400/11/03 سهامی خاص سرمایه اولیه ** تجربه کاری 1.اصلاح هندسی میدان مادر 2اصلاح هندسی میدان نگین 3ایجاد گذر گاه عابر پیاده 4 فرهنگ سازی ترافیک بر مبحث شهر ساری نوین 5…..


Tracking down National Monuments in Ireland

As usual, I can’t quite remember how it started, but this week, I was trying to find a list of all the National Monuments of Ireland. The National Monuments Service publishes lists by county which only contain the ones under state care. These lists have made their way to Wikipedia which is a great start. They have their numbers recorded there which I have transferred to OSM under ref:IE:nm

As usual, I can’t quite remember how it started, but this week, I was trying to find a list of all the National Monuments of Ireland. The National Monuments Service publishes lists by county which only contain the ones under state care. These lists have made their way to Wikipedia which is a great start. They have their numbers recorded there which I have transferred to OSM under ref:IE:nm for the counties of Kilkenny, Laois and Offaly so far. (the key is recorded on the wiki, of course.)

I have sent an email to the National Monuments Service asking for a list, but so far, no reply. I probably have a reputation there by now…

However, I noticed while visiting and taking some pictures of Freshford Church that it has a black plaque (the type of which I had seen before, but never read in much detail) which stated that it was a National Monument.

plaque

I have not been able to figure out what the numbers mean; but there are two buildings (both early modern townhouses) in Kilkenny with the same second number, so I’m presuming it is a category.

I remembered seeing more of these signs in Kilkenny. According to the official list, there are only 3 National Monuments in the City of Kilkenny, but using these plaques, I have already identified 4 more which I have added to the list on Wikipedia. I would not be surprised if Kilkenny turned out to be the town with the highest density of National Monuments, but I can only run that overpass-turbo query, once I have the numbers to add to the key ref:IE:nm.

For now, this is the state of recorded monuments: overpass

In the long run, it would really help if other people photographed these plaques and uploaded them to WikiCommons, so we have the ground truth. And eventually, we might even figure out the numbers from those plaques.

Counties transferred from Wikipedia to OSM:

  • Carlow
  • Dublin
  • Kildare
  • Kilkenny
  • Laois
  • Longford
  • Louth

shrine of St Lachtain's arm (Shrine of St Lachtain’s arm in the National Museum)


Mapping based on Excursions of Feb to Sept 2022, Fort Narraguinnep

I decided to continue trying to use JOSM for this area. I added details around the Narraguinnep Fort Historical Site, which was not simple. To add a point, I sit there in add mode and only click once so it doesn’t become a line? Hopefully that is so because that’s what I did. Then tracking down appropriate tags ended up meaning doing the same thing in iD, so not exactly a good use of time.

I decided to continue trying to use JOSM for this area. I added details around the Narraguinnep Fort Historical Site, which was not simple. To add a point, I sit there in add mode and only click once so it doesn’t become a line? Hopefully that is so because that’s what I did. Then tracking down appropriate tags ended up meaning doing the same thing in iD, so not exactly a good use of time.

I continued on to details of the road around the Benchmark lookout. The track type changes halfway along. It’s nearly the boundary of the USGS map quads, so easy to miss, but they actually marked it. The road stops being improved dirt and becomes high clearance right in the middle. I did manage to figure out from JOSM how to mark that. In fact, now things are getting marked with tracktype. Smoothness was always presented, but maybe not as clear.

I decided to continue on with roads. The Forest Service marks various around the area as primary (trapezoid with an extra line markers on the map, maintained to passenger car standards) and secondary (horizontal numbers in a rectangle, should be to passenger car standards) and as 4x4 (vertical numbers in a rectangle, get the truck or even ATV). So how should one apply them? And why are they all marked as county roads, sometimes with segments with alternating numbers? None of it makes sense. I added some and lengthened some and adjusted some as I could see so their routes are all matching reality a bit better.

Then I decided the manual water pump at Bradfield Campground should be shown. While I was at it, it would be nice if the day use and campground areas were clearly marked, so I started in on doing some shapes. Just click around until back where you started? Hopefully that’s right. It seemed to have the expected result. There’s a handicapped site, so add that somewhat. I added the table, which is covered and handicapped accessible. There’s a toilet that is also that is nearby. Another toilet between the areas. Other picnic tables that are covered. I sorted out where to find the tagging presets better. Getting all those dots marked was still a very annoying process.

I finally got JOSM to actually take me to errors when I check for them. It makes it entirely too easy not to notice there are errors before uploading. Still, there is hope and I’ve got the more detailed Strava heat map set up in it now.


OpenStreetMap Blog

Starting 2023 on the OSMF Board

In January, the new OSMF board met to discuss the work each of us wants to drive forward in 2023. What emerged was an initial, work in progress agenda for the year, with a good distribution of focus areas. Below are a few sentences directly from each of us on what we are thinking and […]

In January, the new OSMF board met to discuss the work each of us wants to drive forward in 2023. What emerged was an initial, work in progress agenda for the year, with a good distribution of focus areas. Below are a few sentences directly from each of us on what we are thinking and how and where we want to contribute in 2023.

We welcome your input and participation. Contact us directly or, if you are an OSMF Member, join our monthly Board meeting. We will continue to develop and refine our ideas, including in a half day screen to screen session, soon.

Mikel:

Fundraising is my top priority, to support our core staff and infrastructure in a sustainable way. We will have dedicated fundraising campaigns across diversified sources including community small donors, public and private grants, and corporate sector engagement. Secondly, I will focus on making OSMF a great place to work, continuing to implement the necessary processes and structures, and supporting them to be successful. Finally, as secretary, I want to give the OSMF a professional, responsive communication tone. The more I think about it, the more I believe that excellent communication is the key to so much – across fundraising, reputation building, and community growth.

Sarah:

I’d like to focus this year on making the daily operations of OSMF run more smoothly, so that the board has more time in the future to focus on strategic matters. This includes yearly planning and budget, smoothly running communications to and from the board and a financial plan where the majority of our operational cost is covered through regular income. I also hope to get some wisdom from our working groups to understand how we can help each other to spread the work more efficiently, and on more shoulders.

Guillaume:

  • moving our corporate registration to EU
  • improving communication
  • facilitate process improvements for OSM tagging, like liquid democracy
  • financial planning and budgeting
  • increasing the diversity of fundraising sources
  • with Grant, increase infrastructure reliability

Arnalie:

For my first year on the OSMF Board, I would like to focus on:

  • Building more local chapters
  • Diversifying OSMF membership, including membership of OSMF Working Groups
  • Ensuring financial sustainability and effective fundraising (an aspect I need to learn more/develop personally)

Roland:

For me, fundraising is the most important thing to do right now. We need money for both long-awaited improvements and daily operations, and our traditional sources of income from individual and corporate members do not even cover our daily operations. At the same time, the Overture announcement has made clear that some data consumers are willing to spend money on reliable map data. So one building block is to adjust the corporate membership levels.

Another aspect is to raise money for improvement projects and, even, completely new projects. History has shown that it is more feasible to secure income for concrete ideas than for an abstract fund. As the board works on behalf of the community, I will bring project ideas into discussion and listen for existing project ideas from the community that are concrete enough for cost estimations so that we have a list of project ideas ready to excite potential donors. I do not expect that every project will be funded, but I do want to see every potential funding opportunity finding an impactful project that it can be invested in.

Craig:

Now, a month in, I’m getting some traction on my election promises.

I want to help OSMF build up the mapping community and support and encourage existing community leaders. My special effort will be in Africa.

I’m keen to prioritise the OSMF diversity and inclusion programme. I have some ideas, but this must be done as a collective effort.

For tech, I’d like to support OSMF documenting its computer operations, updating and improving the software, look at data structures, promoting vector map tiles and keeping the hardware up to date and reliable.

I’m also making an effort to support the administration in a professional way, with a focus on strategic planning, budgeting, fundraising, and communications.

Mateusz:

For starters, it is necessary to keep basic things running – this applies to the OSM community, servers and critical software. Hopefully only routine activities will be needed here.

I am working on a human-readable budget summary – needed for OSMF board work, better transparency and for people interested in what the OSMF is actually doing – especially those who might potentially donate.

GDPR handling is stuck in limbo – and it is the responsibility of the OSMF board to organise the handling of this annoying task.

Lastly, I want to take action on enforcing attribution requirements.

Thursday, 26. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Cruceiro do Tabolado (ou Refexón)

O cruceiro do Tabolado

O cruceiro do Tabolado, ou de Refexón, é o único que está nun cruce de camiños. Varal octogonal, sen inscripcións, un pedestal, sen imaxes. No cruce Louredo-Refexón (cara Remuíño, Arnoia)-Tabolado (Louredo, en liña cos barrios dos Veciños e O Pazo). O seu autor foi don Juan Míguez Domínguez. Do mesmo estilo que o da Alfarrapa e A Torre.

Confluencia de camiños

Pos

O cruceiro do Tabolado

O cruceiro do Tabolado, ou de Refexón, é o único que está nun cruce de camiños. Varal octogonal, sen inscripcións, un pedestal, sen imaxes. No cruce Louredo-Refexón (cara Remuíño, Arnoia)-Tabolado (Louredo, en liña cos barrios dos Veciños e O Pazo). O seu autor foi don Juan Míguez Domínguez. Do mesmo estilo que o da Alfarrapa e A Torre.

Confluencia de camiños

Postos ante o cruceiro (https://cutt.ly/Rb9UofQ), o camiño que sobe cara o pobo e barrio de Louredo (https://cutt.ly/2b9UYVi) queda ás costas (https://cutt.ly/Vb9UJHU), mentres que o do Tabolado (https://cutt.ly/Eb9UFHp) ábrese á man esquerda. Polo primeiro chegas ó peto de ánimas (https://cutt.ly/Rb9U8NJ) e tamén ós restos da escola pía (https://cutt.ly/Yb9Iw9Z). Polo segundo, ás viñas do Pireiro (https://cutt.ly/Bb9UQ6f), Tras do lagar e A Ladeira, ademais da escola do Tabolado (https://cutt.ly/Cb9IQS6), hoxe centro social. Hai un terceiro camiño, o da dereita, Refexón (nos mapas, Refoxón), que baixa cara Remuíño (https://cutt.ly/ob9IRwM) e que empata ca estrada cara Zaparín. Inda que se percorre en coche, hai un camiño que é o vello, quizás hoxe de monte e non practicable (https://cutt.ly/Bb9IUb7), polo que pasaron moitos louredeses no seu camiño ós muíños (https://cutt.ly/Rb9IFTL) do Inquiau (https://cutt.ly/ZYZMwXA).

O nome de cruceiro

Cruceiro do Tabolado, nun cruce de camiños. Moitos din que o cruceiro colócase en lugares así, pero non éa única opción á hora de entender de onde vén a palabra “cruceiro”. Tamén se fala de que poden ser construción en pedra que recordar a cruz procesional. E hainos que macan os límites de poboación (cruz de término).

Por exemplo, en Louredo este é o que mellor recolle as ideas de cruce de camiños e de término. Os restos do vello cruceiro da Alfarrapa, colocados nun muro da viña do Pireiro, por azar recollen a de cruce. Mais, o actual da Alfarrapa está á beira do camiño, quedando a varios metros dun cruce (A Telleira, Soutelo), inda que ben pode ser un de término. O da Torre, tamén á beira, a uns metros da estrada que segue cara O Outeiriño e Os Veciños e o camiño que sube cara os Diestros.

Unha práctica devocional

Cando se pasaba diante dun cruceiro en Louredo había quen rezaba: “Adorámoste, Cristo, y bendecísmote, que por tu santa Cruz redimiste el mundo” (oración que forma parte do Via Crucis).

Un contiño

Alí, na encrucillada do Tabolado, un veciño de Louredo atopouse co demo e recomendoulle este un acto de fe… de fe cristiá!

Xa o contaron os pais dos meus pais, sinalando mesmo o lugar onde aconteceu esta historia. Nos días en que os louredeses baixaban a Remuíño a moer o gran de millo, aconteceu que un home, cargado co seu saco, atopou outro, cun lume pequeno que o quentaba. Eran tempos nos que se cargaba o froito da terra e o traballo dos labregos, levándoo dende as casas ós muíños da zona do Inquiau, no paso do río Arnoia polo concello do mesmo nome.

O camiño de Refexón, en baixada, era unha posible vía romana, e fora percorrido polo padre Sarmiento no s. XVIII.

Chamámoslle Refexón (Refoxón nos mapas) e comeza nunha encrucillada, onde unha simple cruz bendice a quen lle dedica unha oración tranquila.

O caso é que o veciño de Louredo levaba o saco ó lombo e pasou diante do cruceiro de pedra e do home do lume coma quen pasa por diante dun gato. Uns pasos máis alá escoitou que o home lle dicía: escoita, xa que non me saúdas, polo menos saúda a este que está ó meu lado (referíndose á cruz de pedra). Seguíu o seu paso.

Á volta, buscou os restos do lume que quentara a aquel home misterioso… E non os atopou! Fora o demo que, en forma humana, merodeaba pola aldea esa noite!

Para máis información


Self-hosted vector tiles.

Inspired by this video, i want to make my own self-hosted vector tiles.

First, prepare several geojson file by using JOSM. Each geojson file will serve as a “layer”. We can specify the style for each layer. I made three layer (mainroad, suburb, jalan_rest), with this specification

  • mainroad : highway= (secondary | primary | trunk | tertiary)
  • suburb

Inspired by this video, i want to make my own self-hosted vector tiles.

First, prepare several geojson file by using JOSM. Each geojson file will serve as a “layer”. We can specify the style for each layer. I made three layer (mainroad, suburb, jalan_rest), with this specification

  • mainroad : highway= (secondary | primary | trunk | tertiary)
  • suburb : place=suburb
  • jalan_rest : highway= (* && not secondary && not primary && not trunk && not tertiary)

Use JOSM, create overpass query, save as .geojson, repeat.

Second, convert these geojson file to mbtile format by using tippecanoe. Installing tippecanoe on MacOS / Linux is pretty straightforward. But, installing on Windows needs a quick-hack. I followed this guide , it works.

Then combine all those geojson file into one mbtile file by using tippecanoe.

Then, convert that mbtile file to pmtile by using go-pmtiles

Now, let’s display that mbtile and do some styling.

Index.html, first, let’s import maplibre-gl and pmtiles javascript library.

<script src='maplibre-gl.js'></script>
<link href='maplibre-gl.css' rel='stylesheet' />
<script src="pmtiles-2.5.0.js"></script>

Then, define the map

let protocol = new pmtiles.Protocol();
        maplibregl.addProtocol("pmtiles",protocol.tile);
        console.log(maplibregl)
        var map = new maplibregl.Map({
            container: 'map',
            style: 'styles/maptiler-basic.json',
            center: [106.99811303126697,-6.295502009348816],
            zoom: 11
        });

The rest of the configurations are stored on that “maptiler-basic.json”.

Let’s configure the pmtiles file

"sources": {
    "openmaptiles": {
      "type": "vector",
      "url": "pmtiles://bks2.pmtiles"
    }
  }

Then, configure the fonts file

 "glyphs": "fonts-gh-pages/{fontstack}/{range}.pbf"

Finally, configure the actual map style. Match the “layer” from tippecanoe’s output to “source-layer” tag.

Mainroad layer style :

{
      "id": "road_major_motorway",
      "type": "line",
      "source": "openmaptiles",
      "source-layer": "mainroad",
      "layout": {"line-cap": "round", "line-join": "round"},
      "paint": {
        "line-color": "hsl(0, 0%, 100%)",
        "line-offset": 0,
        "line-width": {"base": 1.4, "stops": [[8, 1], [16, 10]]}
      }
    }

Suburb layer style

{
      "id": "place_label_city",
      "type": "symbol",
      "source": "openmaptiles",
      "source-layer": "suburb",
      "maxzoom": 16,
      "layout": {
        "text-field": "{name}",
        "text-font": ["Open Sans Regular"],
        "text-max-width": 10,
        "text-size": {"stops": [[3, 12], [8, 16]]}
      },
      "paint": {
        "text-color": "hsl(0, 0%, 0%)",
        "text-halo-blur": 0,
        "text-halo-color": "hsla(0, 0%, 100%, 0.75)",
        "text-halo-width": 2
      }
    }

Jalan-rest layer style

{
      "id": "road_minor",
      "type": "line",
      "source": "openmaptiles",
      "source-layer": "jalan_rest",
      "minzoom": 13,
      "layout": {"line-cap": "round", "line-join": "round"},
      "paint": {
        "line-color": "hsl(0, 0%, 97%)",
        "line-width": {"base": 1.55, "stops": [[4, 0.25], [20, 30]]}
      }
    }

Road label configuration

 {
      "id": "road_major_label",
      "type": "symbol",
      "source": "openmaptiles",
      "source-layer": "mainroad",
      "minzoom": 13,
      "layout": {
        "symbol-placement": "line",
        "text-field": "{name}",
        "text-font": ["Open Sans Regular"],
        "text-letter-spacing": 0.1,
        "text-rotation-alignment": "map",
        "text-size": {"base": 1.4, "stops": [[10, 8], [20, 14]]},
        "text-transform": "uppercase",
        "visibility": "visible"
      },
      "paint": {
        "text-color": "#000",
        "text-halo-color": "hsl(0, 0%, 100%)",
        "text-halo-width": 2
      }
    },
    {
      "id": "road_minor_label",
      "type": "symbol",
      "source": "openmaptiles",
      "source-layer": "jalan_rest",
      "minzoom": 13,
      "layout": {
        "symbol-placement": "line",
        "text-field": "{name}",
        "text-font": ["Open Sans Regular"],
        "text-letter-spacing": 0.1,
        "text-rotation-alignment": "map",
        "text-size": {"base": 1.4, "stops": [[10, 8], [20, 14]]},
        "text-transform": "uppercase",
        "visibility": "visible"
      },
      "paint": {
        "text-color": "#000",
        "text-halo-color": "hsl(0, 0%, 100%)",
        "text-halo-width": 2
      }
    }

Done!


OpenCage

Interview: OpenStreetMap in Somalia

We chat withmember of the OpenStreetMap community in Somalia about the local OpenStreetMap scene, and the unique challenges faced by mappers there

Today we resume our long-running interview series with OpenStreetMap communities around the world. We turn to the Horn of Africa to learn about OpenStreetMap in Somalia.

image

1. Who are you and what do you do? What got you into OpenStreetMap?

We are Openstreetmap Somalia team: a group of young and passionate volunteers actively engaged in working together to put Somalia on the map.

image Members of the OSM Somalia community at SotM Tanzania in January 2023

2. What would you say is the current state of OSM and the OSM community in Somalia?

Currently we have more than 50 members in our OSM community, most of them YouthMappers members. There are YouthMappers chapters in Mogadishu at Somalia National University and in Qardho at East Africa Universiy.

3. What are the unique challenges and pleasures of OpenStreetMap in Somalia? What things should the rest of the world be aware of?

  • Digital technology illiteracy

  • Lack of political priority in geospatial technology

  • Insufficiency in IT students in general and Geospatial in particular

4. What is the best way to get involved? Is there a regular meet-up? A mailing list? Where does the community meet online?

We do personal meetings once every month the entire community group we update each other on the current state of the map in do some mapping. Online we are on twitter as @OSMSomalia.

5. What steps could the global OpenStreetMap community take to help support OSM in Somalia and east Africa in general?

The global OpenStreetMap community could help in two ways:

  • providing some sort of funding for improving and updating the map

  • providing technical support

6. Our standard closing question: OpenStreetMap will soon celebrate its 20th birthday, so we are well into the “teenager” stage of the project. But what will it look likes when it “grows up”? Where do you think the project will be in 10 years time, both globally, in Somalia specifically?

The heart soul of Openstreetmap depends entirely on its voluntary nature. In that process we have ups and downs, but we are optimistic to have big numbers and grow our community in the future based on the increase in digital accessibility .

many thanks to the members of the Somalia OpenStreetmap community for taking the time to speak withus, but most of all for mapping and growing thier community in difficult circumstances. Keep pushing, keep growing!

Happy mapping,

Ed

Please let us know if your community would like to be part of our interview series here on our blog. If you are or know of someone we should interview, please get in touch, we’re always looking to promote people doing interesting things with open geo data.

Wednesday, 25. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Mapping based on Excursions of Feb to Sept 2022, Calico

This is really just down the road from the last bit. I decided to finally try out JOSM for editing. Everyone’s doing it? It was initially harder to do the simple things. Frustratingly, it wouldn’t let me start a new line rather than adding to an old one as I started adding the trail at the end of the stub of road at the Rio Lado trailhead. This trail was supposed to be a circle on the end of abo

This is really just down the road from the last bit. I decided to finally try out JOSM for editing. Everyone’s doing it? It was initially harder to do the simple things. Frustratingly, it wouldn’t let me start a new line rather than adding to an old one as I started adding the trail at the end of the stub of road at the Rio Lado trailhead. This trail was supposed to be a circle on the end of about 2 miles of trail, but I found about 2 miles of trail and, unrelated to the location of the circle, some other random trails. There were even equestrians on one of them. Back to the mapping, I found that joining these various lines was difficult and I even managed to upload one without any tags at all. I went back and fixed things with iD, which isn’t appropriate. It does say that there’s a steep learning curve.

Then I moved on to the Calico National Recreation Trail. This is a motorcycle trail, but it actually does see plenty of hikers and mountain bikers, too. I was aiming at a bunch of peak bagging along its spine, but apparently was too rusty in my packing of my overnight backpack. I tagged Elliot Peak and returned. Then I took a different route up to the mountain spine to tag a few more peaks in an overnight. Sockrider first and the namesake Calico last.

Here, the map seemed to only have jagged representations of the motorcycle trails of the area which usually stayed within half a mile of the actual trail. JOSM has a tool (shortcut w) that shines for this kind of moving a trail to the correct location and adding nodes between. Strava-iD has a less detailed, possibly older map. I’ve been trying to find the tile server address to use for a custom background in other editors, and someone has made that plain for the JOSM editor even though just searching for it generally didn’t work. That’s how popular JOSM is. So I have that data. It already has the FSTopo (in the transparent overlay form) as an option, another I’ve been searching for. Just searching for tile server addresses really hasn’t worked out for me.

Between those two, I moved the existing trails into lovely curvy things that should represent actual trails. I’ve noticed that there are spots where the general route of travel is not the actual trail. (Specifically, when I hiked it, I found trail around one sub-peak on the way to Sockrider that most were missing. The Strava heat doesn’t show it at all. I assure all, the trail is really there and nicer than the other.) Then I started in on added trails in the area that weren’t there at all. Some I can see a bit. One I hiked. Others, especially their lower bits, come from heat. A few are just the FSTopo version. There’s one more trail that’s visible on USGS that I haven’t added. I decided to add in the informal trails up a couple peaks too. Hopefully this isn’t a mistake with all the motorcycles. I also felt the need to add “motorcycles=no” on a few things even after “motor_vehicles=no”. Yeah, I didn’t just forget. The Motor Vehicles Use Map is the legal document that allows motor vehicle use and it says no motorcycles on these. Also, the Forest Service was doing a good job of signing it.

After a few iterations as I added in layers I could consult, I called this done.

I noticed that the further networks of trails also need a lot of adding, but getting further from where I actually hiked and knew about, I was getting uncomfortable with adding. Some of these have been removed from the current electronic recreation map. (Don’t know what to call this one. It’s powered by Esri and found on USDA sites to map where recreation opportunities exist.) Also uncomfortable were the trails that are on the rec map and the FSTopo and even the map at the Priest Gulch Trailhead, but seem to be at houses at the bottom.

Across the canyon is the Colorado Trail, and it’s a further adventures of badly handled CT. The old name is Highline Trail. The FSTopo puts the name Highline (without trail because they are inconsistent about writing trail on the end when it’s obviously a trail) on one side of the line and Colorado Trail on the other. Someone has named it “Highline - Co. Trail”. It’s two names. At least it doesn’t say (Segment #) after it. I found a couple trails without names and added them, but didn’t evaluate the route they take. Then I clicked on that route and decided to leave it all alone.


Windows Subsystem for Linux

This isn’t directly related to OSM, but many times in “software” or “development” OSM channels someone has asked “how do I do X … on Windows 10?”.

The reason that’s often a question is that, for historical reasons, much of the OSM software used to do things has been developed on Linux. That’s great for people working on Linux themselves, and the Apple Macintosh users can normally jury-r

This isn’t directly related to OSM, but many times in “software” or “development” OSM channels someone has asked “how do I do X … on Windows 10?”.

The reason that’s often a question is that, for historical reasons, much of the OSM software used to do things has been developed on Linux. That’s great for people working on Linux themselves, and the Apple Macintosh users can normally jury-rig something to run that software too.

Windows users can do the same too, by installing “Windows Subsystem for Linux”. Within Windows, search for “Windows Features”:

In Windows Features, tick the box for WSL and click OK:

Windows will want to restart

After the reboot, search for “Ubuntu”:

As noted in the comments, you may need to add “Ubuntu 22.04.1 LTS” from the Microsoft App Store here. When I deleted and reinstalled WSL and Ubuntu to create these notes, I didn’t need to - but it may be that a Microsoft uninstall didn’t do a clean uninstall. Plus ça Change, eh? :)

Ubuntu will install:

and will then prompt for a userid and password:

After that type “lsb_release -a” at the prompt to see the version installed:

No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 20.04.4 LTS
Release:        20.04
Codename:       focal

Apply any pending updates:

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade

(this will take a while the first time)

and you can then head over to e.g. https://switch2osm.org/serving-tiles/ to do whatever it was you wanted to do.


El demonio en el cruceiro de O Tabolado

(Un cuento de san Xoán de Louredo, Cortegada, Ourense)

El cruceiro de O Tabolado, también llamado de Refexón, es uno de los puntos de interés histórico del pueblo de Louredo. En una nota posterior me ocuparé de algunos datos, aquí os comparto un cuento relacionado con él, un fragmento de la tradición oral de los vecinos.

Allí, en el cruceiro de O Tabolado, se encontró un vecino c

(Un cuento de san Xoán de Louredo, Cortegada, Ourense)

El cruceiro de O Tabolado, también llamado de Refexón, es uno de los puntos de interés histórico del pueblo de Louredo. En una nota posterior me ocuparé de algunos datos, aquí os comparto un cuento relacionado con él, un fragmento de la tradición oral de los vecinos.

Allí, en el cruceiro de O Tabolado, se encontró un vecino con el demonio y este le recomendó un acto de fe… de fe cristiana.

Ya lo contaban los padres de mis padres, señalando, incluso, el lugar donde esta historia sucedió. En los tiempos en que los louredeses bajaban a Remuíñoa moler el grano del maíz, sucedió que un hombre, cargado con su saco, se encontró a otro, con un pequeño fuego que lo calentaba. Eran tiempos en los que se cargaba con el fruto de la tierra y el trabajo de los labradores, llevándolo desde las casas hasta los molinos de la zona del Inquiau, al paso del río Arnoia por el ayuntamiento del mismo nombre. El camino, en descenso, era una posible vía romana, y había sido recorrido por el padre Sarmiento en el s. XVIII.

Le llamamos Refexón (Refoxón en los mapas) y comienza en un cruce de senderos, donde un sencillo crucero bendice a cuantos le dedican una callada oración. El caso es que el vecino de Louredo iba con el saco a la espalda y pasó ante el cruceiro y el hombre de la lumbre como quien pasa delante de un gato. Unos pasos más allá escucha que el hombre le dice: oye, ya que no me saludas, por lo menos saluda a este que tengo al lado (refiriéndose al cruceiro).

No cuenta la historia si el hombre siguió tal como había entrado, pero sí que, una vez regresado de moler, buscó los restos del fuego que calentaba a aquel misterioso hombre… Y no los encontró. Por lo visto era el demonio que, bajo forma humana, merodeaba el pueblo aquella noche. Descansando del camino y buscando calor ante el relente de la noche, había aprovechado para lanzarle al despreocupado vecino un pío recordatorio.

Claro, dirás, ¿cómo va a ser el demonio tan devoto? Pues porque el cuento tiene moraleja y todo apunta a la práctica de la oración. No es extraño, cuando el demonio forma parte de un relato donde se deja ver, hablando como un presunto cristiano. Esto lo vimos cuando escribí, en otro blog, sobre ‘El libro de san Cipriano’. Allí se encuentran historias donde Satanás acaba realizando alabanzas a la virtud o advierte contra la depravación del pecador. Puedes leer que el demonio se humilla y declara que Dios es omnipotente o parecerte que es un recurso literario, propagandístico, para mejor llamar a la devoción. El cuento hace referencia a una práctica de nuestros mayores que, ante los cruceiros, susurraban o rezaban mentalmente una oración del Oficio de Semana Santa. La llamada de atención recae en el Enemigo, de modo que se remarca mejor (llamando la atención) la obligación y conveniencia del rezo.

O cruceiro do Tabolado


Mapping farmers markets in leaflet

Querying elements from osm and doing practical things with them is really a useful and fun way of code “hacking” for me. In this case, I wanted to show farmers markets with a reactive map like leaflet like I’ve done before in my journal entries. In this case, I wanted to make it easy to browse the times, seasons, and contact info for farmers markets in the Anchorage, Alaska area. I think with

Querying elements from osm and doing practical things with them is really a useful and fun way of code “hacking” for me. In this case, I wanted to show farmers markets with a reactive map like leaflet like I’ve done before in my journal entries. In this case, I wanted to make it easy to browse the times, seasons, and contact info for farmers markets in the Anchorage, Alaska area. I think with some refinement this map could be useful to sellers and buyers to determine which farmers markets they can fit into their schedules.


library(tidyverse)
library(osmdata)
library(leaflet)
library(htmlwidgets)


marketplace <- opq(c(xmin = -150.494625, ymin = 60.771028, xmax = -148.866047, ymax = 61.550720)) %>%
  add_osm_feature("amenity", "marketplace") %>%
  osmdata_sf()

marketplace_points <- marketplace$osm_points

greenLeafIcon <- makeIcon(
  iconUrl = "https://leafletjs.com/examples/custom-icons/leaf-green.png",
  iconWidth = 38, iconHeight = 95,
  iconAnchorX = 22, iconAnchorY = 94,
  shadowUrl = "https://leafletjs.com/examples/custom-icons/leaf-shadow.png",
  shadowWidth = 50, shadowHeight = 64,
  shadowAnchorX = 4, shadowAnchorY = 62
)

content <- paste(sep = "<br/>",
                 paste0("<b><a href='", marketplace_points$website,"'>", marketplace_points$name, "</a></b>"),
                 paste("<i>", marketplace_points$description, "</i>"),
                 #paste(marketplace_points$addr.housenumber, marketplace_points$addr.street),
                 #paste(marketplace_points$addr.city, marketplace_points$addr.state, marketplace_points$addr.postcode),
                 paste("Phone:", marketplace_points$phone),
                 paste("Email:", marketplace_points$email),
                 #paste("Hours:", marketplace_points$opening_hours),
                 paste( paste0("<b><a href='", marketplace_points$website,"'>", "Website", "</a></b>"))
)


(m <- leaflet(marketplace$osm_points) %>%
  addTiles() %>%
  addMarkers(icon = greenLeafIcon,
             popup = lapply(content, htmltools::HTML)))

saveWidget(m, "farmers_markets.html")
#write.csv(marketplace_points, file = "marketplace_points.csv")

Tuesday, 24. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

National Heritage List for England open data downloads for Vespucci and Orux Maps

GIS data for listed buildings, scheduled monuments (e.g. interesting tumuli) and more can be downloaded from historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/open-data-hub/, and here are some observations based on my experiments with geoJSON and shapefiles.

The data is under the Open Government Licence so OK for editing OSM.

The download can be kept to a manageable size by enabling “Filte

GIS data for listed buildings, scheduled monuments (e.g. interesting tumuli) and more can be downloaded from https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/open-data-hub/, and here are some observations based on my experiments with geoJSON and shapefiles.

The data is under the Open Government Licence so OK for editing OSM.

The download can be kept to a manageable size by enabling “Filter as map moves” in the filter menu (funnel symbol) and then “Toggle filters” when selecting the download.

Vespucci can display a geoJSON layer, show object attributes, and even create preliminary OSM objects from them. But it didn’t work here. I discovered that the downloaded geoJSON uses EPSG:3857 (projected coordinates) whereas the geoJSON standard is EPSG:4326 (latitude and longitude).

An easy way to do the conversion was to go to https://mapshaper.org, “upload” the file (actually it’s processed on the client side), open the console and enter:

-proj from=EPSG:3857 crs=EPSG:4326

and then export.

The resulting geoJSON works well in Vespucci. You can either “Add GeoJSON layer” from the layer menu, or select it in a file manager and open with Vespucci. I could do the whole process above on a modest android tablet.

OSM tags worth thinking about include:

  • heritage = 2
  • heritage:operator = Historic England
  • ref:GB:nhle =
  • listed_status =
  • wikidata =

Note that I’m not suggesting adding anything to the map that can’t be located with a ground survey, and certainly not blindly copying polygons (aside from considerations of verifiable ground truth, these may include a protective buffer around the feature).

I also experimented with OruxMaps version 9.6.3GP; menu Map_tools>Load KMZ/KML/SHP Overlay to show the features over any map including OSM (eg. from OpenAndroMaps). It displays the transformed geoJSON but doesn’t show the attributes when you tap on an object. However, repeating the data download using Shapefile instead of geoJSON, again transforming with mapshaper (you can upload a zipped folder containing the .shp and its auxiliary files), seems to work perfectly.

I hope that helps someone!


Poznámky a linky

Kontrola wikidata: matkoniecz.github.io/OSM-wikipedia-tag-validator-reports/Slovensko%20(Slovakia,%20S%C5%82owacja).html

Google groups waterways cleanup groups.google.com/g/osm_sk/c/vpc9AlUEbD4

Google groups osm adresy groups.google.com/g/osm_sk/c/jNbKYEEfKyo

Vytvorenie návrhu koryta rieky v freemat sk: Cry me a river

Category:Slovakian tagging guidelines: wiki.op


Using the US National Address Database to assist TIGER tag cleanup

The problem with remote TIGER review (and solution!)

I recently did a major road alignment update for Rifle, Colorado. With JOSM and the to-do plugin, it only took a few hours and the road data is much improved. Doing the geometry check was time consuming but easy. Checking that the names are all correct? Isn’t that impossible from my desk? Thankfully no!

There are two kinds of

A JOSM screenshot of the road network for Rifle Colorado

The problem with remote TIGER review (and solution!)

I recently did a major road alignment update for Rifle, Colorado. With JOSM and the to-do plugin, it only took a few hours and the road data is much improved. Doing the geometry check was time consuming but easy. Checking that the names are all correct? Isn’t that impossible from my desk? Thankfully no!

There are two kinds of name checking that I like to do. The first is to check that they are “sensible”, meaning that they have been expanded and there’s no obvious vandalism. The next is that they are “correct”. Because most road names originated from the TIGER import we shouldn’t use it to cross check for “correctness”. The good news is that the National Address Database has data for huge chunks of the country and provides us with another source to get a sense of how good the road network is named.

The workflow

Requirements: JOSM, the MapWithAI plugin, and an area that has NAD data available. I also recommend the AddressValidator paint style.

  1. Download an area you want to do review
  2. Work through the geometry updates however you wish
  3. Use the MWAI plugin to pull down the set of address data for your area.
  4. Merge nodes into the OSM layer
  5. Run the validator.
  6. Review the MWAI “Addresses are not nearby a matching road” warnings.
  7. Delete any unreviewed MWAI data. (Find and delete: type:node AND new AND "addr:housenumber")

If you’d like to keep the addresses, good news!, I’ve written diary entry about working through that data.

Some common errors caught this way

Usually the roadway names match very well so this isn’t a totally onerous task. However, there’s a few classes of errors that seems pretty common:

  1. A typo in the road name (ex: a road name that is close to a different common word and been manually entered incorrectly)
  2. Unexpanded road name (ex: E Diary Entry St -> East Diary Entry Street)
  3. A road that needs to be split because it actually changes names but isn’t reflected in OSM (most commonly a user extending an existing road without knowing)
  4. Missing/wrong directionality or quadrant (ex: 103 Street -> East 103 Street)

Of those, the 4th one seems somewhat optional if the rest of the roads locally do not have directionality markers. For my local area, I updated directionality but there’s some disagreement about what’s “correct”. Up to you.


Data Quality Errors covered by the Asia Pacific Hub

It is very interesting to see the variations in data quality errors in OpenStreetMap per country (Asia Pacific Hub priority countries).

We broke down the type of error per country from OSMOSE and found out some interesting trends.

Like for example, it is noticeable that there are alot of overlapping building errors (~437,652) accounting for the 2nd most common mistake.

As

It is very interesting to see the variations in data quality errors in OpenStreetMap per country (Asia Pacific Hub priority countries).

We broke down the type of error per country from OSMOSE and found out some interesting trends.

Like for example, it is noticeable that there are alot of overlapping building errors (~437,652) accounting for the 2nd most common mistake.

As map contributors, we should also put into highest standard the edits we add to OSM. Maybe in the next few months, we can host to bring these errors down.

Furthermore, some types of errors are generally acceptable like “building over agricultural landuse” and local language. Nonetheless, Thankful for Osmose for this powerful tool.

Link to Database


Motor Vehicle Use Maps

I’ve been updating OSM roads and trails based on the US Forest Service Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM). The USFS MVUM is “the legal instrument that shows where people are allowed to drive”. There are many roads shown in OSM that are not open to motor vehicles, but not properly tagged. There are also few roads and quite a few moto trails missing.

If there’s a road that is not open I j

I’ve been updating OSM roads and trails based on the US Forest Service Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM). The USFS MVUM is “the legal instrument that shows where people are allowed to drive”. There are many roads shown in OSM that are not open to motor vehicles, but not properly tagged. There are also few roads and quite a few moto trails missing.

If there’s a road that is not open I just add motor_vehicle=no. It’s possible that it could be access=no, but often it’s still open to bikes & almost always still open to foot or horse traffic. Since all I really know from the MVUM is motor vehicle access that’s all I usually add. I’ll update the ref tag if it needs it.

The data sources I’ve found for this are a nationwide SHP file and geopdf’s for individual forests.

The shapefiles are available here: https://data.fs.usda.gov/geodata/edw/datasets.php?xmlKeyword=mvum Since that’s the whole country, I use ogr2ogr -clipsrc bounds outfile infile [note the backwards order for the files] & clip to a manageable size. The whole state of Colorado seems to be a manageable size. I don’t directly import anything from the shp file, but If I see a fairly long trail or road missing I’ll copy and paste into a josm layer.

A web search of the forest name & MVUM will yield a page like this: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/psicc/maps-pubs/?cid=stelprdb5177824 (I just noticed that page has SHP files too.) I convert these to tif & load the image into JOSM. gdal_translate -co TFW=YES file.pdf file.tif JOSM is really sluggish with this so if someone has a better way I’m all ears.

My 1st step is usually to load the geopdf into Qmapshack overlayed with my custom OSM map built with mkgmap. I can fairly quickly see differences this way, easier than in JOSM. Once I know what part of the map needs work I load JOSM with the tiff image and make the OSM changes needed. I’m starting to use the SHP file more & may use the tif less.

I have brought Gunnison, San Isabel, and Rio Grande NF up to date.

Monday, 23. January 2023

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

I dati di OpenStreetMap utilizzati a scopo turistico con la collaborazione dell’Ufficio Turistico per l’aggiornamento

Realizzazione di una mappa delle utility utilizzando il servizio gratuito umap che riporta, suddivise per categoria, le attività (utility) presenti nell’area geografica del Comune di Limone P.te:
  • i dati derivano dal database di openstreetmap e sono aggiornati giornalmente con l’utilizzo di google sheet (2 sheet per ogni categoria):

  • il primo sheet import

Realizzazione di una mappa delle utility utilizzando il servizio gratuito umap che riporta, suddivise per categoria, le attività (utility) presenti nell’area geografica del Comune di Limone P.te:

  • i dati derivano dal database di openstreetmap e sono aggiornati giornalmente con l’utilizzo di google sheet (2 sheet per ogni categoria):

  • il primo sheet importa i dati con query csv di overpass turbo modificata grazie a questo turorial; di seguito esempio query

url overpass api =out:csv(::id,::lat,::lon,::timestamp,::type,”“name””,”“amenity””,”“phone””,”“contact:phone””,”“contact:mobile””,”“mobile:phone””, ““website””,”“facebook””,”“contact:website””,”“contact:facebook””,”“email””,”“contact:email”“;true;””,””)] [timeout:20];area[admin_level=8][boundary=administrative]["”ref:ISTAT””=”“004110””]->.boundaryarea; ( node(area.boundaryarea)[amenity=cafe]; way(area.boundaryarea)[amenity=cafe]; node(area.boundaryarea)[amenity=bar]; way(area.boundaryarea)[amenity=bar]; ); out meta center;”)

  • il secondo sheet è una copia completa del primo senza formula ed è inserito come url csv nella mappa delle utility di umap come layer remoto

  • con app script, sempre in google sheet, uno scritp aggiorna giornalemente la query overpass turbo del foglio 1 e sostituisce i dati aggiornati nel foglio 2

Controllo dei dati di OpenStreetMap appartenenti alla categorie della mappa di cui sopra con Qgis e google sheet.

Google Sheet:
  • tutte le categorie dei dati inseriti nella mappa delle utility vengono importate con una sola query complessiva in un foglio di google sheet, con la funzione di importdata riportata sopra

  • con uno script è stato automatizzata l’esportazione del file in formato .tsv da google sheet ad una cartella presente su google drive, la quale è sincronizzata con cartella su computer desktop fisico

Qgis:
  • è stato creato un progetto qgis dovi si trovano i dati aggiornati giornalemente “export-daily” e quelli salvati in locale nel giorno del controllo “poi_export_datacontrollo”; eseguendo filtro temporale sui dati “export-daily” è possibile visualizzare solo quelli modificati dal giorno della data del precedente controllo; (dopo il controllo è sufficiente salvare una copia dei dati live “export-daily” sul proprio computer rimoninando con la data del controllo) immagine

  • per il controllo delle modifiche avvenute sui dati, sia grafico che di contenuto, sono stati applicate espressioni, stili, filtri ed etichette (posizionando il cursore sui punti si apre subito un popup informativo…) immagine

  • per un controllo dei dati sono state inserite anche le note con url alle api di openstreetmap, con le seguenti opzioni di esportazione /notes.gpx?bbox=mybbox;closed=0|layername=waypoints

Aggiornamento dei dati

Grazie alla collaborazione con Olivier Bottero dell’ufficio turistico del comune di Limone Piemonte, si è deciso di promuovere la mappattura in openstreetmap per l’aggiornamento dei dati, utilizzata ad oggi proprio dall’ufficio turistico, con successivo controllo da parte del sottoscritto tecnico Geom, Roberto Brazzelli incaricato dal Comune per aggiornamento della mappa.

Nelle informazioni della mappa delle utility si danno prime informazioni a cittadini o esercenti attività per segnalare errori o nuove attività

..credo che la cosa più difficile sia stata studiare, provare e testare una soluzione più semplice possibile pensando che possa essere riutilizzata facilmente da altri uffici turistici, atl o consorzi turistici…