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Sunday, 23. June 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Day 19 - Village Leminot

Today I mapped Leminot a village with a population of 860, in Korçë.

“#100villagesin100days #day 19”

Today I mapped Leminot a village with a population of 860, in Korçë.

“#100villagesin100days #day 19”


Today's Walk

Walked into town and along seafront down to Lancaster Gardens.

Walked into town and along seafront down to Lancaster Gardens.


OpenStreetMap Blog

Invitation to State of the Map Europe 2024

The OpenStreetMap Poland Association is pleased to invite all members of the OSM community to the State of the Map Europe 2024 conference, to be held in Łódź, Poland, from 18–21 July 2024. In addition to many interesting presentations and talks, it will be an opportunity to meet, discuss and exchange experiences. Conference tickets Conference […]

The OpenStreetMap Poland Association is pleased to invite all members of the OSM community to the State of the Map Europe 2024 conference, to be held in Łódź, Poland, from 18–21 July 2024. In addition to many interesting presentations and talks, it will be an opportunity to meet, discuss and exchange experiences.

Conference tickets

Conference tickets can be purchased at: https://tobilet.pl/state-of-the-map-europe-2024.html

Traveling and accommodation

If you would like some advice on how to get to the conference, and suggestions for accommodation, we have compiled some information at: https://stateofthemap.eu/accommodation.html

If you have questions about traveling to Poland or you would like to ask something else related to the conference, you can write at: https://community.openstreetmap.org/t/invitation-to-the-state-of-the-map-europe-2024/114661

Volunteering

As you know, ’State of the Map Europe’ is a non-profit event, and for organizational purposes we need people who can help us on a volunteer basis.

During the event, we will need volunteers who will be ready to support us in Łódź — mainly on the premises of the Łódź University of Technology (unless other requirements are mentioned). To check what we need and what we offer in return, please see this page: https://stateofthemap.eu/volunteering.html For volunteers from outside Łódź, a limited accommodation will be available.

We are looking forward to seeing you at the conference!

OSM Poland board



OpenStreetMap Poland is a Local Chapter of the OpenStreetMap Foundation, which supports the OpenStreetMap project.

OpenStreetMap was founded in 2004 and is an international project to create a free map  of the world. To do so, we, thousands of volunteers, collect data about  roads, railways, rivers, forests, buildings and a lot more worldwide.  Our map data can be downloaded for free by everyone and used for any  purpose – including commercial usage. It is possible to produce your own  maps which highlight certain features, to calculate routes etc.  OpenStreetMap is increasingly used when one needs maps which can be very  quickly, or easily, updated.


OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

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13/06/2024-19/06/2024 Replica of Kansas City in Minecraft [1] | © Minecraft | map data © OpenStreetMap contributors and USGS Mapping campaigns The campaign to map the flooded areas in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) continues and mappers from all over the world are invited to collaborate on the open projects in the…

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13/06/2024-19/06/2024

lead picture

Replica of Kansas City in Minecraft [1] | © Minecraft | map data © OpenStreetMap contributors and USGS

Mapping campaigns

  • The campaign to map the flooded areas in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) continues and mappers from all over the world are invited to collaborate on the open projects in the HOT Tasking Manager. Links to the projects and other information can be found on the campaign’s wiki page.

Community

  • SeverinGeo will present > on 29 June at the SotM France 2024 > a service to download OSM data translated into French. This offers users an alternative of accessing the raw English OSM data.
  • CartoCité published > an article showing in detail how to dynamically display OSM data from Overpass on uMap.

Events

  • François Lacombe and Jean-Louis Zimmerman will present > a special keynote about the mapping of hydrography in OSM (‘Cartographier les cours d’eau, ça coule de source!’), on June 29 at State of the Map France 2024 > . The authors will highlight the importance of this topic, particularly in the face of global climate change.
  • State of the Map Nigeria 2024, to be held at the Obafemi Awolowo University (Ile-Ife, Nigeria) from 9-11 October, announced an open call for the submission of abstracts for general track presentations and workshops until 31 July. The organisers are also seeking sponsors for the event.
  • Christian Quest presented the special keynote ‘Panoramax: l’alernative libre pour photo-cartographier nos territoires’ (Panoramax: the free alternative for photo-mapping our territories) at the festival ‘Pas Sage en Seine’ (PSES 2024) and showed the Panoramax resources and the prospects for the future of the project.
  • If you’re looking for a reason to go to London in September – Geomob, the geospatial event series organised by OpenCage, is celebrating OSM’s birthday with a very special event on 18 September. The evening will feature five speakers with talks focused exclusively on OSM-related topics. One of the speakers will be Prof. Muki Haklay, who was there at the very, very beginning.
    He authorised the first OSM server for Steve Coast, who was a student at UCL at the time.
  • State of the Map Malawi 2024, to be held at the Malawi University of Business and Applied Sciences (MUBAS) between 18-20 July, has an open call for abstracts until 24 June. The organisers are also offering three categories for sponsorship of the event.
  • There is an open call until 30 June, 2024, for OSM communities interested in hosting State of the Map Africa 2025.
  • At the SotM France on 28 June Yohan Boniface will present > an instance of the uMap dedicated to public bodies in France. The project received French public funding from the ‘Accélérateur d’Initiatives Citoyennes’ (Accelerator of citizens’ initiatives) and the ‘Incubateur des Territoires de l’ANCT’ (ANCT territory incubator) programs, thus it was developed in only six months.

Maps

  • OSM for Cities is a platform that provides daily updated maps of Brazilian cities using OpenStreetMap data. It features various datasets categorised into areas like cycling, health, education, and more, each showing detailed information with tag coverage percentages. The platform is in early development and aims to expand its coverage and capabilities.

OSM in action

  • [1] A Minecraft builder, AtmosphericBeats, used custom software integrating OpenStreetMap and USGS data to create a 1:1 scale replica of Kansas City, USA, in Minecraft within 36 hours. This innovative project accurately represents buildings, roads, and natural features, demonstrating the potential of combining OSM data with gaming platforms for detailed and realistic virtual recreations.
  • Guess This City is an interactive game in which users click on a blank map to reveal hidden map tiles. Players try to identify the city shown with the fewest clicks.
  • Offensive OSINT discussed the integration of OpenStreetMap into the Open Source Surveillance system, enhancing its geolocation investigation capabilities. It provides a tutorial on using OSM and the Overpass Turbo API to search for various points of interest and objects in the vicinity of specific locations. The update aims to make geolocation easier and more efficient for analysts and researchers by using detailed and up-to-date geospatial data from OSM.
  • Dawn Chorus is a citizen science and art project that invites people around the world to record and share bird songs to document biodiversity, support scientific research, and raise awareness of nature. The Explore page allows users to listen to and explore a variety of bird songs recorded by participants. The interactive map and timeline features allow users to filter recordings by date, location, and species, providing a unique way to experience and study the diversity of bird song across regions and time.
  • TxtDariNAROGONG utilized OpenStreetMap waterway data to visualise the history of Bekasi’s water management system, from the Tarumanegara Kingdom era (circa the 5th century AD), through the Dutch colonial administration, to the recent Indonesian Republic era.

Software

  • Let’s welcome Anton Khorev as an additional maintainer for the OpenStreetMap website code, as confirmed by the recently merged pull request.
  • OSR is a memory-efficient, multi-mode OpenStreetMap router designed for pedestrian, bicycle, and car navigation. It uses compact data structures and memory-mapped files to efficiently import route data, supporting large maps with relatively low memory requirements.
  • Tobias Jordans posted about his efforts to modernise the OSMCha tool by migrating the frontend to a new React-based framework, improving the UI/UX with Tailwind CSS, and tackling technical debt.

Programming

  • Bulgent provided > an introduction to using PyOsmium, a Python library for processing OpenStreetMap data. The post covers installation, basic usage, data extraction, geographic calculations, and GeoJSON output. He also contrasts PyOsmium with another library, Pyrosm, highlighting their respective strengths and weaknesses for different OSM data processing tasks.

Releases

  • dpschep announced updates to Overpass Ultra, enhancing its customisation features, including loading queries from URLs and Gists, improved configurability for interactive map views, bundled icons for easy integration, and examples demonstrating these features, all aimed at facilitating the creation and sharing of custom Overpass-powered maps.

Did you know …

  • … you can load OSM data onto a Garmin eTrex? Localized to Japanese?
  • Geomob? A series of events and a podcast aimed at geospatial enthusiasts, providing a platform to discuss geoinnovation for both fun and profit.

OSM in the media

  • Grab will provide updated maps of Tengah, a newly developed town in Singapore, to assist residents, drivers, and delivery riders with navigation in the rapidly developing district. This initiative, supported by the OpenStreetMap community, leverages AI technology to improve accessibility and address the needs of service providers in the area.
  • The Youth Innovation Lab presents the BIPAD Portal, a disaster management system in Nepal that integrates OpenStreetMap data to support risk communication and informed decision making.

Other “geo” things

  • Matt Brown introduced two detailed maps of medieval and Tudor London produced by the Historic Towns Trust, highlighting the extensive research and archaeological information used to depict the layout of the city in the 13th and 16th centuries. The maps are available online and in fold-out paper versions.
  • The Linux Foundation Europe has launched the Open Mobile Hub (OMH), a project aimed at simplifying mobile app development through an open-source framework. OMH provides SDKs and tools for seamless integration with mapping services, including OpenStreetMap. Like Overture which wants to address the fragmentation of geographic Open Data, this initiative aims to address fragmentation in mobile development and improve cross-platform user experiences by offering a unified codebase and an extensible plugin architecture.
  • MapFast allows users to quickly create customised, detailed maps by uploading data without needing geometric boundaries or coordinates. It supports CSV files, automatically geocodes geographical information, and offers various customisation options like colours, text, and legends. Users can export maps in PNG or SVG formats and create maps for free with optional subscription plans for advanced features.
  • The latest #geoweirdness thread from OpenCage discusses the geopolitics of football in general and specifically the EURO 2024.
  • The Guardian reported the development of a quantum compass for the London Underground, a subatomic instrument that aims to provide precise location tracking where GPS signals are unavailable. This technology leverages quantum mechanics to enhance navigation and could revolutionize how underground and other GPS-denied environments are navigated, offering greater accuracy and reliability.
  • Komoot released three major improvements in June. New route guidance ensures fewer interruptions. For road cyclists, the route planner now evaluates the road surfaces, guides to road bike-friendly routes, and reduces gravel sections. The new mountain bike router offers insider knowledge about the best trails.
  • OpenStreetMap Japan has announced > the Governor’s Cup Open Data Hackathon 2024, where participants will develop digital services using Tokyo’s open data to solve administrative problems.

Upcoming Events

Where What Online When Country
OSMF Engineering Working Group meeting 2024-06-21
Alto Maé “B” 💻 UCM (Maputo, MOZ) – Oficina sobre mapeamento com OpenStreetMap! 2024-06-21 flag
Bengaluru OSM Bengaluru Mapping Party 2024-06-22 flag
Dover Coffee and Mapping! 2024-06-23 flag
Bielefeld OSM Ostwestfalen-Lippe 2024-06-25 flag
City of Edinburgh Geomob Edinburgh 2024-06-25 flag
Kaiserslautern OSM Einführung und Schulung 2024-06-25 flag
San Jose South Bay Map Night 2024-06-26 flag
Hannover OSM-Stammtisch Hannover 2024-06-26 flag
[Online] OpenStreetMap Foundation board of Directors – public videomeeting 2024-06-27
Lübeck 143. OSM-Stammtisch Lübeck und Umgebung 2024-06-27 flag
Lyon SotM-FR 2024 – Lyon 2024-06-28 – 2024-06-30 flag
Düsseldorf Düsseldorfer OpenStreetMap-Treffen (online) 2024-06-28 flag
中央区 マッピングパーティ in 北海道神宮 2024-06-30 flag
Tartu linn FOSS4G Europe 2024 2024-06-30 – 2024-07-07 flag
MapRoulette Community Meeting 2024-07-02
Missing Maps London Mapathon 2024-07-02
Stuttgart Stuttgarter OpenStreetMap-Treffen 2024-07-03 flag
Dresden Dresden – OSM Stammtisch 2024-07-04 flag
臺北市 OpenStreetMap x Wikidata Taipei #66 2024-07-08 flag

Note:
If you like to see your event here, please put it into the OSM calendar. Only data which is there, will appear in weeklyOSM.

This weeklyOSM was produced by MatthiasMatthias, Raquel Dezidério Souto, Strubbl, YoViajo, barefootstache, derFred, freyfogle, mcliquid, miurahr, rtnf.
We welcome link suggestions for the next issue via this form and look forward to your contributions.


OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

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Wi fi 5G


Tag approval

Good news! Heavy goods vehicle and HGV have been accepted into the Oxford English Dictionary as of this month. Now that these are proper British English words, we can finally tag all those truck restrictions we’ve been holding off on.

Good news! Heavy goods vehicle and HGV have been accepted into the Oxford English Dictionary as of this month. Now that these are proper British English words, we can finally tag all those truck restrictions we’ve been holding off on.

Saturday, 22. June 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

I won't grant permission to use my CC0 software

The Creative Commons Zero (CC0) waiver is, in my opinion, the most free way to release open-source software. Unlike licenses that impose conditions on the use, modification, or distribution of software, CC0 allows me to waive all my rights to limit what users can do with the software. It effectively places the work in the public domain. This absolute waiver ensures that the software can be freel

The Creative Commons Zero (CC0) waiver is, in my opinion, the most free way to release open-source software. Unlike licenses that impose conditions on the use, modification, or distribution of software, CC0 allows me to waive all my rights to limit what users can do with the software. It effectively places the work in the public domain. This absolute waiver ensures that the software can be freely used by anyone, for any purpose, in any way. Here’s why I choose CC0 when releasing open source software and why I cannot – and will not – grant permission to use my CC0 software.

Software freedom

Other licenses impose various requirements on using software, such as:

  • Copyleft/viral licensing: Mandates that derivative works also be open-source and follow the same licensing conditions.
  • Attribution requirements: Requires giving credit to the original authors in all copies or substantial portions of the software.
  • Redistribution conditions: Imposes specific terms on how the software can be redistributed, including the requirement to state changes made to the code.
  • Source code disclosure: Requires making the source code available to anyone who receives a copy of the software.
  • License compatibility issues: Restrictions that affect the ability to combine the licensed software with other code under different licenses.

In contrast, CC0:

  • Imposes no obligations for attribution.
  • Requires no disclosure of source code.
  • Does not mandate any specific licensing for derivative works.
  • Places no restrictions on combining CC0-waivered software with other code.

This complete freedom fosters innovation, as developers can build upon CC0-waiver software without worrying about legal ramifications or compatibility issues with other licenses.

That means:

  • Hobbyists can use it.
  • Companies that make money can use it.
  • People I don’t like can use it.

This last point (and sometimes these last two points) often gives open-source developers heartburn. However, I feel that I cannot prevent people I don’t like from using my open-source contributions without also harming the good that comes from my contributions being widely available for use. Broad adoption leads to a more vibrant and diverse ecosystem of software, where software can be reused and repurposed in innovative ways, driving technological advancement, and resulting in services and applications that make people’s lives better.

The closest thing to worldwide public domain

In some countries, you either cannot legally put software in the public domain, or “it’s complicated,” due to legal concepts that, as an American, I cannot even begin to comprehend. This can complicate or even prevent the dedication of software to the public domain. To address these legal complexities, CC0 attempts to waive as many rights as possible, providing the most free fallback license for jurisdictions where a public domain waiver is not recognized.

Credit

It is reasonable that open-source contributors want credit or attribution for their contributions, either for their résumés and career advancement, or simply out of pride. However, the desire for credit should not overshadow the potential benefits of contributing to the common good. For CC0-waivered software, credit is not a mandatory requirement, which can sometimes be perceived as a drawback. But this very aspect also eliminates any barriers for the adoption and use of the software, ensuring that the work can be freely incorporated into other projects without the need for complicated legal considerations.

By waiving all rights, authors of CC0-waivered software make a clear statement: they are contributing their work for the common good, with no expectation of control or credit. This selfless act can set and example to others to contribute similarly, fostering a culture of sharing and collaboration that benefits everyone.

CC0-waivered software prioritizes influence over notability. By allowing unrestricted use and distribution, the software has the potential to reach a wider audience and be utilized in more diverse and creative ways. This broad adoption can lead to greater impact and technological progress, ultimately benefiting the community as a whole. While individual authors might forgo personal recognition, the influence of their work can be far-reaching.

Why I cannot grant permission to use my CC0 software

While CC0 grants complete freedom to anyone to use my software without seeking permission, my choice to not explicitly grant permission is to emphasize the point of choosing CC0 in the first place:

By releasing my software under the CC0 waiver, I have released all my rights to the work, including the right to grant or withhold permission for its use. This is not a matter of choice or preference; it is a fundamental aspect of the CC0 waiver. The CC0 waiver is irrevocable, meaning that the freedom it provides to users cannot be undone or restricted by the original author. Therefore, I cannot grant permission because I no longer possess the legal authority to do so.

True software freedom means giving up control, and CC0 allows me to do just that.


OM Guru Fellowship Experience and the Journey Beyond

I started my journey in OSM Mapping contribution in September 2020. I have worked in multiple OSM HOT Tasking projects in ID editor and JOSM. The community has been a blessing for me as it was more engaging and conscious of OSM mapping and having a journey making the world a better place through OSM Mapping.

At the end of December 2023 Open Mapping Hub- Asia Pacific hosted a program call

I started my journey in OSM Mapping contribution in September 2020. I have worked in multiple OSM HOT Tasking projects in ID editor and JOSM. The community has been a blessing for me as it was more engaging and conscious of OSM mapping and having a journey making the world a better place through OSM Mapping.

At the end of December 2023 Open Mapping Hub- Asia Pacific hosted a program call to all active contributors to embark on a journey with AP-Hub of fellowship of active mapping and community engagement with AP-Hub network and OSM community. I passed the exam with joyous remarks. I was selected for Mapping track out of 15 been selected for the Mapping Track of OM Guru Fellowship. There was 3 different track set by AP-Hub, one Mapping track (tasked for mapping), 2nd Validation Track (tasked for validation of OSM Mapping), and 3rd Training track (Tasked for training participants). On first month, we had 100 task mapping in HOT Tasking Manager. It was a rigorous mapping in Philippines, Vanuatu and Micronesia. On 2nd month, we have worked on Everydoor App POI collection. I have roamed around my neighborhood to taking detailed data of the POIs. On the 3rd month March 2024, we worked on Mapillary of 500 images. Then on 4th month April, we worked on QGIS mapping, before and after image of OSM Mapping and 100 mapping tasks in HOT Tasking Manager. On 5th month May 2024, we validated 200 tasks in HOT Tasking Manager.

The entire journey had made me a consistent mapper and having learnt many new applications to contribute to OSM Mapping, I am grateful to AP-hub for the amazing opportunity.


5 Jahre OpenStreetMap

Einleitung

5 Jahre - und ein paar Tage, habe selber viel zu tun momentan - sind es schon her, seit dem ich mir ein Account auf OpenStreetMap angelegt habe. Für mich fühlt es sich eher wie 20 Jahre an, weil sich so viel verändert hat, sowohl bei mir, als auch in der Welt um mich herum. Ich weiß aber noch, warum ich damit angefangen habe und wo ich stand zu dem Zeitpunkt.

Hintergrund

In di

Einleitung

5 Jahre - und ein paar Tage, habe selber viel zu tun momentan - sind es schon her, seit dem ich mir ein Account auf OpenStreetMap angelegt habe. Für mich fühlt es sich eher wie 20 Jahre an, weil sich so viel verändert hat, sowohl bei mir, als auch in der Welt um mich herum. Ich weiß aber noch, warum ich damit angefangen habe und wo ich stand zu dem Zeitpunkt.

Hintergrund

In dieser Zeit finge ich ernsthaft an, mich mehr und mehr für Datenschutz zu interessieren. Davor hatte ich dieselben Medien benutzt, die die meisten benutzen würden - ein stinknormales Android mit Google-Account und WhatsApp, für E-Mails vertraute ich GMX und die sozialen Netzwerke meiner Wahl waren YouTube und Twitter (letzteres heißt mittlerweile X, da E. Musk diesen Buchstaben so sehr liebt wie er selbst). Über den Kuketz-Blog bin ich erstmals auf OpenStreetMap gestoßen. Die Datengrundlage in meinem Wohnort war aber recht alt zu dem Zeitpunkt und nach einiger Wartezeit kam ich zum Entschluss, selber anzupacken, da sich die Lage nicht verbessert hatte.
In dieser Zeit hat sich viel bewegt - sowohl in der OSM-Community als auch außerhalb. Ich habe aber aus persönlichen und gesundheitlichen Gründen kaum mit der Community interagiert, sondern eher meine eigenen Sachen gemacht. Jedoch haben wir uns dennoch ohne große Kommunikation gegenseitig geholfen.
Die meisten Edits waren eher kleiner und spontaner Natur, aber ich hatte auch einzelne größere Projekte durchgeführt:

Größere Projekte

Bus-Projekt LNG Fulda

Ende 2019 wurde das Liniennetz von den Behörden neu gestaltet, was ich als Gelegenheit nutzte, die alten Routen und Relationen auf Stand zu bringen und in das neue Public Transport Schema zu übertragen. Teilweise was das sehr aufwändig, besonders bei langen Überlandlinien mit seinen zahllosen Varianten für den Schulverkehr. Da ich kein Auto habe, sondern “nur” ein Fahrrad ohne E-Motor, dauerten die Erkundungstouren teilweise von früh morgens bis in die Nacht hinein. Entsprechend habe ich viele Kilometer zurückgelegt - der Rekord liegt bei 120 km. Leider kam ich bis heute nicht dazu, das Hünfelder Land zu erkunden.

Dorferneuerung Großenlüder-Bimbach

Einige Zeit lang wohnte ich dort und bemerkte, wie auf dem Land üblich, das die Daten spärlich und teilweise veraltet waren. Mithilfe der Hintergrundbilder Hessen DOP20 und Hessen ALKIS habe ich das gesamte Dorf, Straße für Straße, Haus für Haus, überarbeitet. Möglicherweise war ich etwas zu eifrig, doch konnte ich auch gut lernen, wie die heutigen Pendlerdörfer strukturiert sind. Nach meinem Umzug wurde das Schema fürs Straßenparken überarbeitet, wodurch diese Daten veraltet sind. Ich hoffe, jemand Ortskundiges kann da mal nachschauen.

Grenzdaten Stadt Fulda

2021 habe ich das Amt gefragt, ob die die Grenzen der Stadt Fulda und seiner Stadtteile kennen und dem OSM-Projekt übergeben würden. Für mich persönlich diente es in erster Linie der korrekten Bestimmung es ref_name-Tags bei Haltestellenbereichen, aber sicherlich gibt es noch viele andere Zwecke. Dem wurde glücklicherweise zugestimmt und ich konnte auch die einzelnen place-Tags nach Lage, Struktur, Größe usw. besser bestimmen.

Zukunft

Was ich in Zukunft vor habe, sobald ich wieder mehr Zeit habe, ist, die GTFS-Daten der RhönEnergie im Rahmen des Bus-Projekts zu übertragen. Leider weiß ich nicht, wie man das anstellt. Vielleicht frage ich die Community im Forum nach oder schaue, ob jemand das bereits gelöst hat. Außerdem will ich die einzelnen Haltestellen abfahren und vervollständigen.
Eventuell interagiere ich auch etwas mehr mit der Community, wer weiß schon. Bis dahin kartiere ich fleißig weiter und verbessere die Karte Stück für Stück.

Grüße, greenie11


My OMGuru Fellowship Journey Under Validation Track

Greetings, fellow mappers! I am thrilled to share my journey as an Open Mapping Guru Validation Fellow. This fellowship, organized by the Open Mapping Hub Asia-Pacific, has been an enriching experience filled with learning, collaboration, and significant contributions to the OpenStreetMap (OSM) community.

My OSM Journey From Beginner to Advanced Mapper

My journey with OpenStreetMap began

Greetings, fellow mappers! I am thrilled to share my journey as an Open Mapping Guru Validation Fellow. This fellowship, organized by the Open Mapping Hub Asia-Pacific, has been an enriching experience filled with learning, collaboration, and significant contributions to the OpenStreetMap (OSM) community.

My OSM Journey From Beginner to Advanced Mapper

My journey with OpenStreetMap began back in December 2021 during a training organized by the Geomatics Engineering Students’ Association of Nepal (GESAN). The collaborative spirit of OSM and its mission to create free, up-to-date maps for everyone instantly captivated me. Unlike other mapping services, OSM is a community-driven platform that offers unrestricted use, much like Wikipedia. Till then, I’ve started mapping my way around different parts of Nepal and have since expanded my efforts to encompass the global landscape. Over time, I became an active mapper, regularly contributing to the platform. The more I mapped, the more I realized the importance of accurate and up-to-date data, which led me to the Open Mapping Guru Fellowship. Last December, I learned about the Open Mapping Hub AP’s OMGuru Fellowship from a fellow colleague and luckly I got selected for the Validation track. It’s been an incredible journey so far, and I am thrilled to have made a significant and tangible impact on the broader OSM community.

Becoming a Validation Fellow

In early 2024, I enrolled in the Guru Program of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) and learned about the OM Guru Fellowship. Intrigued by the Validation track, I applied and was fortunate to be selected. The Validation track focuses on ensuring the accuracy and reliability of map data, which is crucial for disaster response, humanitarian efforts, and other vital uses. The sense of purpose that comes from knowing my work helps create dependable maps for these causes has been deeply fulfilling.

Fellowship Experience

The OM Guru Fellowship was a transformative journey. I learned to use powerful validation tools such as OSMCha, Osmose, OSM Inspector and MapRoulette. These tools helped me conduct thorough quality checks and address errors precisely. Each task presented new challenges, keeping me engaged and continuously improving my skills as a validator. One of the most rewarding aspects of the fellowship was the collaborative environment. Working alongside other passionate mappers and validators from around the world was inspiring. The guidance and support from mentors like Mikko, Dinar, and Honey were invaluable, helping me navigate challenges and grow as a mapper.

Learnings and Achievements

The fellowship reinforced the power of collaboration in open mapping. Every validation task and discussion highlighted the collective effort needed to create high-quality maps. It’s humbling to be part of a global network of dedicated individuals working towards the same goal—an accurate and accessible map for everyone. My most significant achievement during the fellowship was improving the reliability and trustworthiness of OpenStreetMap. Every error I corrected and every validated data point contributes to making OSM a valuable tool for communities in need. This journey has taught me the importance of attention to detail, patience, and continuous learning.

Impact and Future Directions

The fellowship has had a profound impact on my perspective on open mapping. The skills I gained in problem-solving and critical thinking will be invaluable as I continue my mapping journey. Moreover, the fellowship opened doors to future collaborations with OSM communities worldwide. The connections I made and the knowledge I gained will help foster a more inclusive and comprehensive mapping community.

Lastly, this Fellowship has been an incredible experience, and I am deeply grateful to the Open Mapping Hub Asia-Pacific team for this opportunity. As I continue my journey with OSM, I am committed to using my validation skills to support communities and contribute to a more resilient future for all. This is just the beginning of my story with OpenStreetMap. Happy mapping!

Tags: #OpenMapping #ValidationFellow #HumanitarianMapping #OSM #OpenMappingGuruFellowship #OpenStreetMap #HOT #OMHAP #OMGuru #OSMNepal #GESAN #YouthMappers


Day 18 - Villages Frashër and Jaran

Today I mapped two villages and their surroundings because the villages were small and partially mapped. The villages mapped today were Frashër and Jaran, one in south Albania and one in North Albania.

“#100villagesin100days #day 18”

Today I mapped two villages and their surroundings because the villages were small and partially mapped. The villages mapped today were Frashër and Jaran, one in south Albania and one in North Albania.

“#100villagesin100days #day 18”


The OSMF License Charade

The OSM community some time ago adopted the ODbL license, which (roughly speaking) has two major requirements for users of our data:

  1. To contribute their own data back to OSM (the “share alike” clause)
  2. To include attribution on products built from our data

It’s almost certain that most mappers — especially those contributing regularly — have encountered a

The OSM community some time ago adopted the ODbL license, which (roughly speaking) has two major requirements for users of our data:

  1. To contribute their own data back to OSM (the “share alike” clause)
  2. To include attribution on products built from our data

It’s almost certain that most mappers — especially those contributing regularly — have encountered a map on the web or in printed form based on OSM data that violated the attribution requirement in some way. The attribution text might have been shuffled out of the way, credit for our work given to somebody else, or the attribution was absent completely. By my estimate, around 10% of websites that use OpenStreetMap tiles lack proper attribution. This is in addition to an unknown proportion of maps with similar problems published on physical media (especially info panels installed outdoors), or ones using custom tiles not made by OSM. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that proper attribution is missing on widely-used map products published by large companies with hundreds of thousands to millions of users.

The OSM project celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, and one would expect that should be enough time to develop effective mechanisms for addressing license violations. This obviously is not the case. We as a community delegated the right to enforce the license to the OSM Foundation, but enforcement is something this institution has yet to demonstrate. All the OSMF has accomplished in this regard is to publish a “love letter” which individual volunteers are supposed to use, containing language that asks violators to fix the attribution problem. There is no follow-up procedure in place for situations when the violator fails to respond in the desired way. We also have no mechanism that actively looks for violations, relying instead on volunteers to report cases to one of a number of case-tracking lists that mappers created over time.

I speculate this state of affairs is the result of a desire typical for normal people to avoid confrontation, amplified by the volunteer context of the OSM project. We could have heeded these instincts and adopt a different license — one that would not necessitate enforcing, but we did not. We adapted this particular license for a reason, and the OSMF should therefore do everything it can to defend it.

I recently made a proposal* to the OSMF that would incentivize individuals to look for violators and actively work on cases. The proposal is based on the idea that resolving violations takes time, for which the individual “case workers” should be compensated if they so desire. I proposed the compensation to take the form of either own volunteer work of any kind or money. However, the proposal relies on the OSMF’s willingness to amend the Terms of Use in a way that would endorse the case workers’ claim for such a reward. More broadly, the proposal calls for the OSMF to step up to that exclusive right we delegated to them and defend the license in court if necessary.

I received some feedback about the proposal on the OSMF Licensing Working Group forum (not public) and also on the OSM-legal-talk mailing list, but I received no response from anybody in the OSMF. These conversations (or their absence) lead me to a conclusion that there is resistance from the OSMF to enforce the attribution clause of the license, regardless of the enforcement mechanism used (the one I proposed or others). I might be wrong in the conclusion, but OSMF can clarify their position. Failing to do so will confirm that my suspicion is correct.

Some will argue that the cases of violations are low in number and generally do not pose any harm to our efforts or the community. This opinion, however, is not only deeply unfair to the mappers for whom the attribution is about the only visible benefit they get, but also carries a moral risk — it broadcasts the notion that it’s not necessary to worry about the license much. Our whole licensing efforts and apparatus then start to look like a farce.


  • In fact I submitted two proposals. The first called for the use of the Rovas application, which among other benefits, allows payments for violations to be made with volunteer time. After some objections from the LWG group I submitted a 2nd proposal that avoids use of any 3rd party applications. If there is interest, I can write another post with comparison of the existing cases resolution mechanism to the proposed ones.

Friday, 21. June 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Day 17 - Village Shtëpëz

Today I mapped the village Shtëpëz in Gjirokaster. The location where the village is pointed is full of abandoned, ruined buildings. You can check here.

After mapping all the ruined buildings I moved downhill, closer to the river because it made sense that the village might have moved closer to the water source and indeed I found tens of houses scattered in the hill and closest to the ri

Today I mapped the village Shtëpëz in Gjirokaster. The location where the village is pointed is full of abandoned, ruined buildings. You can check here.

After mapping all the ruined buildings I moved downhill, closer to the river because it made sense that the village might have moved closer to the water source and indeed I found tens of houses scattered in the hill and closest to the river. I mapped this area, which seems to be the new location of the village.

“#100villagesin100days #day17”

Thursday, 20. June 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

Survey on the use of OSM.org

We are a study group from the University of Brasília (UnB) conducting research on OpenStreetMap (OSM.org). Our goal is to improve OpenStreetMap by better understanding the profiles of its users. Through this research, we aim to gather valuable information that will allow us to identify the needs, preferences, and challenges faced by users when using OSM. Participating in the survey will take bet

We are a study group from the University of Brasília (UnB) conducting research on OpenStreetMap (OSM.org). Our goal is to improve OpenStreetMap by better understanding the profiles of its users. Through this research, we aim to gather valuable information that will allow us to identify the needs, preferences, and challenges faced by users when using OSM. Participating in the survey will take between 5 to 10 minutes. Your responses will be confidential and anonymous. Please answer all questions sincerely. For more information or if you have any questions, please contact us via email at gustavo.soares@aluno.unb.br. We count on your collaboration to improve this important collaborative mapping tool. Help us translate: https://kutt.it/translaterea

Survey on MS Forms

Survey Backup on Cryptpad

FAQ

Why are you using Microsoft Forms?

We have access to Office365 through an agreement between the university and Microsoft (I don’t really agree with this agreement), so for us, MS Forms was the best solution as it has no response limit and supports multiple translations. Why didn’t we use LimeSurvey? It’s paid. But if you’re not comfortable responding via MS Forms, we also published on Survey Backup on Cryptpad

Who are you?

We are an extension group at the University of Brasília (UnB). During university education in Brazil, we have the opportunity to develop projects that benefit the community. Currently, we consist of 2 students and two professors.

Is there an official project page?

No 😔 We are a small project. However, if it helps, I have published some diaries on OSM discussing ideas on how to improve OSM.org https://www.openstreetmap.org/user/PlayzinhoAgro/diary

How can I help?

You can help by sharing the survey! ;) Or help translate or review it into a language that is not yet available in the form. https://kutt.it/translaterea (Note: we use Google Sheets, if you want to help but don’t want to use Google Sheets, contact me on Telegram Gustavo22soares or email) We haven’t started any interface development yet; we plan to start thinking about it in the second half of 2024. If you want to help, you can contact me via email and tell me your skills and how you want to help gustavo.soares@aluno.unb.br.

How can I follow the project?

You can follow me on social media and on OSM Perfil OSM

Mastodon

Twitter (x)

Github

Do you intend to publish the results?

Yes, we plan to write an article with the results and publish the data on GitHub. We believe this data can help other researchers and the OSMF to improve OSM.

Why are you asking for my age?

The survey is answered anonymously, and if you prefer, it can be even more anonymous by responding via Cryptpad, so we can’t know your exact age! But we want to understand how each generation deals with OSM. In our round of conversations with Brazilian mappers, many started between 2007 and 2012. We can understand this as the growth and establishment of the internet.

How were the responses formulated?

We started with a round of conversations with active mappers in the Brazilian community, and from that, some questions arose that needed to be validated.

Why are you doing this project?

The main goal is to improve OSM.org, but it’s also an opportunity for us to learn and put our skills into practice.

OSM.org is not for the “end user,” so your research is useless!

We don’t think so! First, any improvement for the “end user” also impacts usability for mappers, and it’s also an opportunity for us as students of a public university to give back to the community the education we are receiving. As students, we have a unique opportunity for learning and personal development! I imagine many in the community feel grateful for finally being heard regarding the issues of OSM.org, and moreover, it’s an opportunity for the community to finally have a group of designers concerned about user experience, as not all FOSS projects have this same opportunity!


toilets:disposal=vault

I have been deeply tempted to use this. There have been times when I didn’t even tag the disposal not because it slipped my mind, but because “pitlatrine” is wrong.

From the wiki for toilets:disposal=pitlatrine, “waste falls into a lined or unlined pit”. This is a lie. A pit is an unlined hole in the ground. A pit toilet uses an unlined hole in the ground. A lined hole in the ground is a

I have been deeply tempted to use this. There have been times when I didn’t even tag the disposal not because it slipped my mind, but because “pitlatrine” is wrong.

From the wiki for toilets:disposal=pitlatrine, “waste falls into a lined or unlined pit”. This is a lie. A pit is an unlined hole in the ground. A pit toilet uses an unlined hole in the ground. A lined hole in the ground is a vault and the difference is important to land managers and, I would argue, the end user.

As to land managers, one example would be the United States Forest Service. If an area has over a certain number of visitors a year, they try to supply a toilet facility. If that number is still few enough, a (unlined) pit toilet is sufficient. Over a certain amount, it needs to be a vault. This is due to the waste leaching into the surrounding soil with an unlined system. With sufficient volume, it’s more likely to cause contamination in the area.

When a pit toilet is full, the land manager digs a new hole, moves over whatever construction they’ve got in place to help you stay above ground while you make your deposit, and cover over the old hole. When a vault toilet is full, someone comes to pump that thing out and it stays just where it was before.

For the end user, well, the stories I could tell you about using a pit toilet. The floor of the one in Little Round Valley sagged as I stepped into it. Volunteers had just finished digging the hole and moving the little building over it at Santa Cruz Guard Station as I arrived. Practically smell free throughout the stay! Most of the rest of the backcountry pit toilets in the area don’t actually have full buildings, just 0-3 privacy walls around a topped hole. When not spacious by not having a complete set of walls, they tend to be exceedingly tight. The building of one near Blue Lakes was so tight, it was hard to stand to pull up my pants without opening the door.

I don’t have these kinds of stories about vault toilets. The horse parking one at First Water was getting pumped out when I was there. I’ve got some on how people treat vault toilets, but that’s not about just the toilet itself. They’re a much more uniform item, being a larger construction. Usually they’ve got sufficient room for a wheelchair even if it would be hard to get a chair up the step outside.

I expect there’s a few others thinking as I do. There’s 102 improved_pitlatrine and another 45 blair_ventilated_improved_pitlatrine. No one has gone for vault yet. It’s universally used by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management, but that doesn’t make it the UK usage. They are far outweighed by the 65362 uses of pitlatrine, but most of my own uses and some where I have not tagged would be better as vault, at least if we were using American English. (I’m not keen on improved_pitlatrine simply because it doesn’t say how. One (unlined) pit toilet I encountered was outfitted with a lid several decades old that proclaimed itself patented and capable of fitting tightly to prevent flies and smell! Improved, but not meaningfully. On the other hand, vault is very specific to the disposal.)


My experience w/ OMGuru Fellowship

As a proud OSM contributor since the start of 2023, I’ve been busy mapping my way around Jalpaiguri and the North Bengal region, leaving a trail of improved data in my wake. It’s been an incredible journey so far, and I’m thrilled to have made a tangible impact on the OSM community. But, I didn’t stop there.

Last December, I learned about the Open Mapping Hub AP’s OMGuru Fellowship from

As a proud OSM contributor since the start of 2023, I’ve been busy mapping my way around Jalpaiguri and the North Bengal region, leaving a trail of improved data in my wake. It’s been an incredible journey so far, and I’m thrilled to have made a tangible impact on the OSM community. But, I didn’t stop there.

Last December, I learned about the Open Mapping Hub AP’s OMGuru Fellowship from a fellow OSM India member, and I just had to apply. Long story short, I got accepted, and it’s been quite great ever since.

Through the OMGuru Fellowship, I’ve had the chance to dive deeper into the world of OSM and learn about an array of tools and techniques for contributing to and improving OSM data and sharpen up my skills using JOSM. Specialising in Validation Track, I’ve honed my skills in ensuring the accuracy and quality of data – a crucial aspect of mapping that’s often overlooked. But it’s not just about validating HOT TM tasks; I’ve also acquired the skills to further map my region, add quality data, and even use it for research and analysis (cue the HOT x DataCamp Scholarship).

It’s been an incredible experience, and I’m excited to see where my newfound expertise takes me next. The OMGuru Fellowship has been a game-changer, and I’d like to extend my gratitude to HOT and APHub for the opportunity to have been a part of it, and to Mikko, Dinar and Honey for their guidance (esp. Mikko and Dinar, you guys have helped me out a lot and take on questions which I now realise were REALLY dumb :’D).


OMGuru Mapping Fellowship Experience

I started using OpenStreetMap in 2020 when I realized the amount of surveillance put upon us by Google and other similar services. I wanted to use software which respects my privacy. In the process, I discovered OpenStreetMap - a map which is privacy-respecting, run by the community, and can be used without restrictions, similar to Wikipedia. When I noticed that some points of my interest were n

I started using OpenStreetMap in 2020 when I realized the amount of surveillance put upon us by Google and other similar services. I wanted to use software which respects my privacy. In the process, I discovered OpenStreetMap - a map which is privacy-respecting, run by the community, and can be used without restrictions, similar to Wikipedia. When I noticed that some points of my interest were not on the map, I started editing and adding things in 2021. Subsequently, I became an active mapper by mapping regularly over many years. Besides using and mapping, I also advocate and promote the use of OpenStreetMap and raise awareness about it.

At the start of 2024, I enrolled in the Guru Program of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) and got to know about the OMGuru Mapping Fellowship program in March 2024. The tasks ranged from mapping amenities using mobile applications like Every Door to remote mapping using HOT Tasking Manager, which is a sophisticated mapping management tool.

Before the fellowship, I did not have much experience with remote mapping, especially buildings. This program gave me an opportunity to hone my skills in JOSM, adding one more editor to my mapping arsenal. My friend contrapunctus helped me in catching up with JOSM. Another skill I learnt was validating already mapped tasks, which is done to ensure data quality and provide feedback to mappers on their work. My mentor Honey Grace Fombuena was very patient and accessible throughout the fellowship, making my experience smoother.

I am highly grateful to HOT and APHub for providing me this opportunity.

Credits: contrapunctus and sahilister for proofreading.


Closing Images for Open Mapping Fellowship

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

map literacy at community school map literacy 2 map literacy 3 at my workplace interacting with my friends my workplace 2


Day 16 - Village Kafaraj

I thought i would never finish this village. Kafaraj is a big farming village surrounded by greenhouses located in Fier and with a population of around 1120.

“#100villagesin100days #day16”

I thought i would never finish this village. Kafaraj is a big farming village surrounded by greenhouses located in Fier and with a population of around 1120.

“#100villagesin100days #day16”

Wednesday, 19. June 2024

OpenStreetMap User's Diaries

My Exploration as an Open Mapping Guru Fellow

It was a privilege for me to be part of the HOT’s Open Mapping Guru Fellowship Programme, where I sharpened my mapping skills and became more knowledgeable about OpenStreetMap (OSM) tools. Though I had many trainings for volunteers in OSMmany times, this was first time I am involved in a longer programme with a structured plan. The structured training activities and assignments helped me learn a

It was a privilege for me to be part of the HOT’s Open Mapping Guru Fellowship Programme, where I sharpened my mapping skills and became more knowledgeable about OpenStreetMap (OSM) tools. Though I had many trainings for volunteers in OSMmany times, this was first time I am involved in a longer programme with a structured plan. The structured training activities and assignments helped me learn about OSM such as validation techniques, changeset discussions, and creating MapRoulette challenges. Beyond expanding my knowledge base, this fellowship introduced me to an energetic community of mappers that has livened up my journey as a mapper.

As a Fellow of Open Mapping Guru, my adventure was a crazy pursuit of education, discovery and community involvement. The program allowed me to go deeper into the Open Street Map (OSM) tools and sharpen my skills in mapping, validation and community collaboration.

In this fellowship period I explored some new JOSM plugins such as validator.other which made validation tasks much faster, easier and enhanced data quality. Another different aspect of mapping is when I would actively contribute to changeset discussions. The use of tools such as OSMOSE and OSM Inspector to identify issues of data quality was something which I liked the most in the entire program. For some reason creating my first MapRoulette challenge was not done to a satisfying level. I will be exploring the tool in detail later in the programme.

Besides that, going through OpenStreetMap Changeset Analyzer aka OSMCha again reminded me of how we dealt with vandalism in OSM of Taj Mahal before thanks to the development SEED blog post quoting the Taj Story. That was noticed by chance and usage of tools like OSMCha will help in analysing these in a much better systematic way.

As the fellowship came to a close, I thought about all the lessons that I had learned and the developments that had taken place during this fellowship. Additionally, I am enthusiastic about what lies ahead; This involves advancing on new tools; continuing to engage in community and also venturing into mapping with new tools.

Although I used to write, advocate, and preach about OSM wherever possible, this fellowship became a reason to write my first OSM Dairy too.

Also check about other OSM writings
1. Mapping Evolution in my Life
2. Tutorials
3. OSM Kerala - The past, present and future
4. Mapping for Tomorrow: Building Resilience through OpenStreetMap Contributions
5. All my writings on OSM


Cyprus: new districts

20 new districts will emerge in Cyprus on July 1, 2024.

Needs mapping

  • Μεταρρύθμιση Τοπικής Αυτοδιοίκησης (Κύπρος) (Wikipedia)

  • www.moi.gov.cy/moi/moiup/moi.nsf/All/DB4E590D370B845EC22587FB002B3982?OpenDocument#

  • Mapping convention

Other:

  • 2022 district groups

Open Mapping Guru Fellowship

To map with a cause in mind…

THROWBACK… My mapping journey began in 2016. I started as a volunteer of Project NOAH – a disaster risk reduction and management program of the Philippine Government. Through its risk mapping initiative, I was engaged in OpenStreetMap tracing of building footprints in some provinces of our country. Even though the project was phased out last 2017, I continued to c

To map with a cause in mind…


THROWBACK… My mapping journey began in 2016. I started as a volunteer of Project NOAH – a disaster risk reduction and management program of the Philippine Government. Through its risk mapping initiative, I was engaged in OpenStreetMap tracing of building footprints in some provinces of our country. Even though the project was phased out last 2017, I continued to contribute to other initiatives that utilize and improve on OSM data. Some of these are UnmappedPH and OSMaPaaralan. Driven by my interest in carrying out humanitarian mapping focused on Disaster Preparedness and Response, I was fortunate to join the 2022 Data Quality Internship of Humanitarian Openstreetmap Team. This program paved the way for more opportunities for me.

Forward to 2024, Open Mapping Hub Asia Pacific’s call for Guru Fellows:

Open Mapping Guru

  • For this Fellowship, I have been invited to participate and become a part of the VALIDATION Track which primarily focus on OpenStreetMap (OSM) data quality aspect through validating tasks of assigned urgent projects.
Key Outputs:
  1. Validate tasks on HOT Tasking Manager
  2. Engage in changeset discussions
  3. Clean-up of OSM data
  4. Create MapRoulette Project/Challenge
  5. Validate changesets using OSMCha
  • As a highlight to this fellowship, I find it note-worthy and gratifying that the community has evolved into a force for good. From mappers, validators, to trainers alike, the AP Hub proved that the program it has implemented measured up to its own expectation. Indeed, a lot has really been achieved in the past months and sustaining it in the future would surely help to capacitate more advocates of open mapping.
Key Takeaways:
  1. There is no doubt that this fellowship has expanded the horizon now serving as a platform for better public access and consumption.

  2. This initiative as well by the hub builds up the base for more motivated contributors and volunteers.

  3. The cause for mapping is sustained through localized efforts.

To this end:
  • I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Asia Pacific Hub and the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team in general, for giving me as well as many others, such avenues where we hone our relevant skills and consolidate our individual efforts towards helping communities around the world through various capacities including TRAINING of potential contributors or volunteers, MAPPING of specific projects, and VALIDATING which ensures better data quality.

  • My gratitude also goes to our TRACK MODERATORS. I would particularly mention, Mikko, Honey, and Dinar who collectively administered and managed the fellowship with great competency and skill. They have ensured that such an endeavor would be fruitful for everyone involved. It is also worth mentioning that relative to this, questions by fellows that need to be answered are well addressed with proper guidance, making a mechanism for smooth feedback.

To more mapping… #APHub #OMGuru #HOT #OSMPH

Day 15 - Villages Kuzhnen and Kotorr

Kuzhnen was almost fully mapped, so I only had to add some buildings. I also surveyed the surrounding area and added a few more structures, but there wasn’t much left to map.

After that, I decided to explore around my hometown and added buildings in some small villages. Still not satisfied, I moved down the list and also mapped Kotorr.

I didn’t know we had a village named Kotorr

Kuzhnen was almost fully mapped, so I only had to add some buildings. I also surveyed the surrounding area and added a few more structures, but there wasn’t much left to map.

After that, I decided to explore around my hometown and added buildings in some small villages. Still not satisfied, I moved down the list and also mapped Kotorr.

I didn’t know we had a village named Kotorr in Elbasan. The only Kotorr I knew of was in Montenegro.

I have also been mapping in Kosovo and North Macedonia lately and have been enjoying the process.

“#100villagesin100days #day15”